New Consumer Website Launched with Intent to Separate Anti-aging Fact from Fiction

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The website, called antiagingsupplementnews.org, will focus on supplementation and, according to it’s stated editorial mission, will “attempt to separate the hucksters from real science in the supplement industry.

One of the first assignments for this experienced investigatory team was a new supplement that claimed to be a super antioxidant-rich formulation that increased cardiovascular health by lowering cholesterol.

A new consumer website created to help sort through the endless stream of so-called life extension products hitting the market these days, launched last week. The website, called antiagingsupplementnews.org, will focus on supplementation and, according to it’s stated editorial mission, will “attempt to separate the hucksters from real science in the supplement industry."

According to the National Census Bureau, Baby Boomers are currently turning 65 at the rate of 10,000 per day, “and their appetite for supplements that promote better health while turning back the hands of time appears to be insatiable” says the website. “Our goal is to carefully look at as many of these anti-aging products as possible, especially the ones drawing tons of hype, and give our readers a detailed, unbiased assessment.”

The website is comprised of journalists, many of whom were displaced by a downturn in newspaper industry. “We’ve been fortunate to assemble a group of top investigative reporters, some of whom found themselves out of a job amid plummeting newspaper subscriptions and impossible budget constraints,” said antiagingsupplementnews.org spokesman Dwayne Anders. “We just gave them a list of products, and no restrictions… and told them to do what they’ve always done, investigate!”

One of the first assignments for this experienced investigatory team was a new supplement that claimed to be a super antioxidant-rich formulation that increased cardiovascular health by lowering cholesterol, among other health benefits, such as energy levels, and vision as well.

Anders said the first stages of their report can be read at the website, but briefly, the product combines brown seaweed extract, squid extract and Vitamin D. “We noticed that this product, called Marine D-3, had been getting some press recently, so it seemed like a good place to start.”

“While the choice of ingredients were intriguing, we wanted to take a closer look at the person or group behind the product itself,” Anders said. “It turns out that the product was formulated by Dr. Richard Linchitz, a medical doctor who graduated with honors from Cornell University Medical College and went on to found the first nationally accredited, outpatients multispecialty pain program in New York. That was important to us, because we see so many products that are backed by huge marketing companies merely looking to make a fast buck.”

According to Anders, the key ingredient in Dr. Linchitz’s supplement is a brown seaweed derivative, known as Seanol, which is harvested at depths of 100 feet off the coast of Japan and Korea.

“The doctor’s work with this supplement, and in his practice, is based on the fact that marine animals have the strongest natural defense systems on earth, thriving in the harshest of environments due largely to their diet, and their ability stave off cell damage,” reports antiagingsupplementnews.org. “We were able to confirm that the Seanol is indeed up to 100 times more powerful than better known antioxidant land-based sources, such as vitamin C, vitamin E, blueberries, green tea, and red grape resveratrol.”

Anders said his team also examined the ORAC scale (the recognized method for measuring antioxidant potency), and found the brown seaweed (Seanol) used in Dr. Linchit’s product registered at 8,368 compared to blueberries, for example, which have a rating value of 2,400. “At this point, it’s heard to dispute that antioxidants value of this product, but we have more work to do before we reach a final verdict on the product.

The website says it’s also looking at seven additional products that are making longevity claims. “One of them is a product that is formulated with snail trail slime, if you can believe that,” he said. “The point is, there’s no shortage of investigative work for our reporters in this multi-billion dollar industry.

For reporting on supplements related to anti-aging, you can read the latest product reviews and get free reports at http://antiagingsupplementnews.org/.

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Keith Baxter
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