New Release Showcases Contributions of The Civilian Conservation Corps at Grand Canyon National Park; Book by Robert Audretsch

Share Article

From 1933 to 1942, nearly three million men in the Civilian Conservation Corps performed conservation work in national parks, state parks, national forests and other publicly held lands. The Corps’ work in the Grand Canyon is the focus of this new book released by Dog Ear Publishing on a topic close to the author’s heart: Audretsch spent almost 20 years as a ranger at the park.

Dog Ear Publishing releases "Shaping the Park and Saving the Boys" by Robert Audretsch.

The (Civilian Conservation) Corps was a saving grace for young men beaten down by the Great Depression and its 25 percent unemployment rate.

The Grand Canyon National Park was just one beneficiary of the Civilian Conservation Corps program, a brilliant piece of legislation that brought work for the unemployed and revived the country’s natural resources. The Corps was a saving grace for young men beaten down by the Great Depression and its 25 percent unemployment rate. From 1933 to 1942, nearly three million men performed conservation work in national parks, state parks, national forests and other publicly held lands. The Corps’ work in the Grand Canyon is the focus of this new book on a topic close to the author’s heart: Audretsch spent almost 20 years as a ranger at the park.

Shaping the Park and Saving the Boys showcases improvements in the Grand Canyon’s infrastructure. Trails, roads, telephone lines, fences and trail rest houses benefited visitors in the park shortly after their construction, and many still exist today. From the first corps camp at the South Rim to the Colorado River Trail, Corps members put their hearts and souls into digging, constructing and restoring the canyon’s assets. Photos from the park’s museum collection and other archives illustrate the rugged conditions. The well-researched book details not only the work men performed but their leisure time and daily life in camp. President Franklin Roosevelt’s ambitious plan paid off: The Corps saved national treasures and forever changed the lives of its members.

Author Robert Audretsch retired as a National Park Service ranger at the Grand Canyon National Park in 2009. Audretsch, who has degrees in history and library science from Wayne State University, has now devoted himself to research and writing full time about the Civilian Conservations Corps.

For more information, visit http://www.CCCBooks.org

SHAPING THE PARK AND SAVING THE BOYS: THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS AT GRAND CANYON, 1933-1942
Robert Audretsch

Dog Ear Publishing

ISBN: 978-145750-529-4                        140 pages                         $19.95 US

Available at Ingram, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble
and fine bookstores everywhere

About Dog Ear Publishing, LLC

Dog Ear Publishing offers completely customized self-publishing services for independent authors. We provide cost-effective, fast, and highly profitable services to publish and distribute independently published books. Our book publishing and distribution services reach worldwide. Dog Ear authors retain all rights and complete creative control throughout the entire self-publishing process. Self-publishing services are available globally at http://www.dogearpublishing.net and from our offices in Indianapolis.

Dog Ear Publishing – self-publishing that actually makes sense.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Alan Harris
Dog Ear Publishing
(866) 823-9613
Email >
Visit website