USA Bird Supply Offers 10 Bird Gift Ideas For Winter Birding

Share Article

Bird Feeders, Heated Bird Baths, Winter Roosts And Shelters

Winter Bird Shelter

Winter Bird Shelter

USABirdSupply.com offers bird gift ideas for the winter months ahead. Climate changes are affecting birds and where they winter. According to Audubon analyses, many species are moving north to winter, reflecting global warming. Purple Finches and Wild Turkeys have moved 400+ miles north in the last 40 years, while the Marbled Murrelets, Ring-Billed Gulls, Red-Breasted Mergansers, and Spruce Grouse have moved 300-360 miles north. Pine Suskins, Fox Sparrows, Boreal Chickadees and House Finches have moved 250+ miles north.

However, some species are not moving north, to their detriment, as their habitat becomes drier. This includes the burrowing owl, the meadowlark, whose population has declined 72% in the last 40 years, the vesper sparrow and generally grassland species.

Living in Southern California, Florida, or the Southern US, winter might mean swing temperatures from the low 40’s to 70’s. In the northern part of the US, the winter means very cold weather and snow.

USABirdSupply.com Offers 10 Bird Gift Ideas For Winter

1. Winter Shelters – Picture blowing wind, horizontal snow, bitter cold and weighing less than one ounce. Placing winter shelters facing south ideally under eaves, in a safe area from predators and protected from the wind and heavy snowfalls can provide huddled birds warmth and protection from the environment. USABirdSupply.com offers winter shelters for birds and is a great gift.

2. Winter Roosting Boxes– Roosting boxes allow small birds to huddle together for warmth. They differ from a bird house in that the hole is at the bottom rather than the middle or top to reduce heat loss. They also have perches inside allowing many birds to huddle. Place the box facing south, in a protected area, safe from predators and relatively close to feeders. Hang out nesting materials and the birds will stuff them inside the box for additional warmth. Chickadees, wrens, titmice, and woodpeckers will use a roosting box. The box should be about 12 feet off the ground. A metal or slate guard around the hole will help deter squirrels. After the holidays, Christmas trees can be placed outside for a shelter as well.

3. Heated Bird Baths – Birds require fresh water for drinking and bathing year round. A heated bird bath or heating element placed in an existing bird bath will encourage birds to frequent feeders as they will have access to both food and water. While birds do eat snow, it reduces their body heat. USABirdSupply.com offers pedestal as well as deck- EZ-tilt heated bird baths. In the warmer US regions, having a bird bath year round near feeders provides an ideal bird watching environment.

4. Suet - Suet is a high energy food with a high fat content that helps keep birds warm. Having a window suet feeder, hanging suet feeder or suet log is essential for winter bird feeding. There are numerous varieties of suet including hot pepper. The hot pepper taste deters squirrels but not birds. Chickadees, nuthatches, blue jays as well as woodpeckers will be attracted to suet. Bluebirds, warblers, kinglets, titmice, and wrens prefer suet with small seeds. USABirdSupply.com offers a wide variety of suet feeders and types of suet.

5. Bird Seed – Seeds with high fat or oil content provide energy and should be selected based on the types of birds that winter in your area. These would include black oil sunflower seeds, nyjer, white millet, and peanuts. To reduce waste and have no-mess, buy hulled seeds in the winter.

6. Striped vs. Oil Sunflower Seeds – Oil sunflower seeds have more oil than striped sunflower, are smaller and have a thinner shell which is easier to open. Striped sunflower seeds are larger with a thicker shell. While most birds such as cardinals, chickadees, nuthatches, titmice and blue jays eat either type, sparrows and blackbirds have a harder time opening striped sunflower seeds.

7. Feeder Placement - Ground Feeders for southern areas that do not have snow in the winter attract juncos, brown thrashers, towhees, and sparrows. In areas with more challenging winters, the bird feeders should be placed out of the wind and should have the area beneath them cleaned of snow so the ground feeders can eat. Hopper and platform feeders attract cardinals, blue jays, chickadees, and titmice.

8. Cleaning Feeders And Bird Baths Before Winter – Before it gets too cold, clean and sterilize the feeder to reduce mold and get rid of old seed. Use gloves and a stiff brush. Feeders should be cleaned once a month. To clean the feeder there are several methods: one part bleach to nine parts hot water, mild unscented dish detergent in solution, or 4 parts water to 1 part white vinegar. Scrub and rinse thoroughly. Fill when completely dry. The same ratios can be used for bird baths. Also clean the area below feeders with a broom or shovel and hose down. There are also long cleaning brushes and easy-clean tube feeders with removable bottoms. USABirdSupply.com offers cleaning brushes, easy clean tube bird feeders, and bottled bird bath and bird house cleaners.

9. Bird Feeder Rain Guards – Rain guards, which in some cases double as a squirrel baffle, protect tube feeders which do not have a cover over feeding ports. Guards help with rain (in warmer regions) and snow in colder areas.

10. Squirrel Proof Feeders and Baffles - Using hot pepper suet and red cayenne/hot pepper in feed helps deters squirrels (but not birds). Squirrel proof feeders come in a variety of styles—weight activated, tube feeders in wire cages, and battery operated feeders that flip, tip and whip squirrels off the feeder. Safflower, nyjer seed and natural and hot pepper suet are not favorites of squirrels. Baffles can also be effective for feeders and when mounted on top protects the seed from rain and snow.

USABirdSupply.com is Located in Clarence, NY Outside Buffalo And Offers Over 1100 Bird Products Including Squirrel Proof Feeders, Hummingbird Feeders, Purple Martin Houses & Gourds, Bird Feeders, Bird Houses, Bird Baths, Garden Art, Bat & Owl Houses, Garden Flags, Butterfly Feeders, Live Mason Bees, and Honey Bee Supplies.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Janice Barton
Visit website