GolfersAdvice.com Announces its Number One Golf Tip of 2011, ‘Course Anger Management’

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There’s no telling how many millions of golf strokes are lost yearly when golfers lose their temper, says consumer golfing news and instruction website GolfersAdvice.com, which recently announced its Number One Golf Tip 2011, “Course Anger Management.”

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Even the great Bobby Jones, reminded Brown, was famous for his temper tantrums, and was once widely criticized for storming out his first Open Championship in England early in his career before finally conquering his outward emotions in later years.

There’s no telling how many millions of golf strokes are lost yearly when golfers lose their temper, says consumer golfing news and instruction website GolfersAdvice.com, which recently announced its Number One Golf Tip 2011, “Course Anger Management.”

“If you ever wondered how many strokes anger can cost you, John Daily reminded us once again when he melted down and stormed off at the star-studded Emirates Australian Open last week,” said GolfersAdvice.com Senior Editor Joe Brown. “After finding the sand trap on the 10th hole, Daily, who was extended a players exemption by tournament organizers, mistakenly hit the wrong ball out of the bunker resulting in a two-stroke penalty. Still steaming from the mistake, Daily proceeded to dunk seven balls into the water hazard on the next hole, eventually running out of balls and exiting the tournament.”

Brown, who had just announced Course Anger Management as the website’s Number One Golf Tip of 2011, said felt like a “Tin Cup” moment, in reference to the classic Kevin Costner golf movie, where Costner’s character also suffered from extremely self-destructive anger issues. “Certainly, the game has a rich history of illustrious golfers who were just as famous for pitching a fit, as they were hitting a pitch shot.”

The veteran golf reporter sited Tommy Armour, often referred to as “Terrible Tommy,” as one of the game’s all-time infamous angry golfers. “He won 15 times on the tour, and once joked, ‘Never break your driver and your putter in the same round.’ Brown recounted a Ben Hogan quote about Armour, when he said, ‘If he had had his head screwed on right, he would have been the greatest golfer of all time.”

While Armour anger issues cost him dearly on the course, Brown said he did have a number of excellent golf tips for other golfers with similar problems. “We included some of the in our feature story, The Number One Golf Tip of 2011. For example, Tommy recommended that instead of stewing over the last bad shot, to instead focus like a ‘man possessed’ on the upcoming shot. He also said if you’re really ticked off… to play out several next shot scenarios over and over in your head, which will force you to forget about the angry emotions from the last shot.”

Even the great Bobby Jones, reminded Brown, was famous for his temper tantrums, and was once widely criticized for storming out his first Open Championship in England early in his career before finally conquering his outward emotions in later years. “Certainly, Tiger Woods is known not only for his play, and fiery competitive spirit, but also for his club slinging and choice words of disgust always aimed at himself. Colin Montgomerie, Craig Stadler and Sergio Garcia are also well known for their surly dispositions on the course at times. Most notably in recent history, it was Garcia who used the 13th hole at Doral as his personal spittoon on national TV.

“We also used a few of Sadler’s Course Anger Management tips in our ‘Number One Golf Tip of 2011’ story.’ Brown said. “For example, the walrus once told a group of reporters, ‘I used to make a bad shot, and it would stay with me for three or four holes. Then I was able to cut that down to two or three holes... then just two or three shots. Now, if I make a bad shot, I'll still get mad, but I’ve learned to get over it by the next shot.”

Brown believes that Phil Mickelson, a Master’s winner who will be inducted into the Golf Hall of Fame next year, is also a master at containing his emotions.

“Phil is famous for making a complete mess out of a hole, only to bounce back with a birdie or better on the next one,” he said. “Even when he collapsed at the 2006 U.S. Open on the final hole, it wasn’t anger that destroyed his championship bid, but a few poor club and shot selections.”

Brown said that course anger management was named the Number One Golf Tip of 2011 because of its impact on a person’s entire game. “Doctors tell us that the body’s reaction to anger actually causes your adrenal glands to pump cortisol, the fight or flight hormone, along with epinephrine into your system. So along with the self-destructive nature of getting angry and the negative impact it has on others in your playing group, it also messes with your body’s physiology big time.”

He said it was sad to see somebody with John Daily’s immense talent, who has worked so hard to overcome other demons in his life, still have so much trouble controlling his emotions on the golf course. “That’s why we believe that course anger management is as important as any other golf tip we can offer to golfers of any level.”

The “Number One Golf Tip of 2011 – Course Anger Management,” and other golf tips and news can be downloaded for free at http://golfersadvice.com/403/beginner-golf-tips-irons.html.

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