“Hands-On” Physical Therapy Replaces Surgery for a Common Life-Threatening Condition, Developers Say

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Developers of the Wurn Technique® (patent pending) report new findings on their manual physical therapy protocol

Abdominal adhesions are a primary cause of small bowel obstruction, a common life-threatening condition.

SBO repair is a common emergency surgery in the US,” said Larry Wurn, Co-developer of the Wurn Technique® and Director of Clinical Research at Clear Passage Physical Therapy®.

Developers of the Wurn Technique® (patent pending) report new findings on their manual physical therapy protocol. The therapy is now being used to replace surgery for some patients with small bowel obstruction, a common life-threatening condition. The Wurns began testing their therapy as a treatment for small bowel obstruction (SBO) after a scientific study showed their therapy opened totally blocked fallopian tubes – a procedure previously thought impossible without surgery.

“SBO repair is a common emergency surgery in the US,” said Larry Wurn, Co-developer of the Wurn Technique® and Director of Clinical Research at Clear Passage Physical Therapy®. “When the bowel (intestine) is blocked, food cannot pass through; this quickly becomes a life-threatening event.”

“The blockage is often caused by adhesions,” he explained. “Unfortunately, small bowel obstructions can recur when adhesions form again, to help the body heal from the very surgery used to repair them. The therapy is considered innovative because it requires no surgery; thus, it avoids associated risks, and the chance of complications.”

“Some of the results have been remarkable,” he said. “One patient’s intestines were so blocked that she could not eat solid food, and she had pick-lines in her arms for intra-venous nutrition. After therapy, she had the feeding tubes removed because she could eat normally.”

“One man arrived reporting bowel obstructions two to three times a week. He wanted to avoid hospitalization and surgery. Since therapy two months ago, he has had no recurrence of symptoms,” Wurn said.

The therapists began treating small bowel obstructions when a patient contacted them after reading about their success opening blocked fallopian tubes. “Since we were having success opening organs as small as the fallopian tubes, it made sense that we might also be able to help patients with bowel obstructions,” said physical therapist Belinda Wurn, who co-authored the study on opening fallopian tubes non-surgically. “When patients with SBO requested we treat them, we started seeing those important organs (the intestines) opening and becoming more functional.”

The Wurns said that current findings, while promising, are preliminary, and that no scientific evidence has yet been published on this aspect of the therapy. But they are encouraged by clinical success, and have started gathering data that will lead to more formalized clinical trials. “Because surgery is considered a major cause of bowel obstruction, we hope it may give some patients a better chance at avoiding future obstructions,” Belinda said.

In the initial study, the therapy opened fallopian tubes in most of the women with totally blocked tubes, and most of those became pregnant naturally. A scientific report of the therapy (Wurn Technique®, patent pending) was published in Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, and reviewed in Contemporary Ob/Gyn. For more information, visit http://www.clearpassage.com.

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Alishia Curtis
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