In Case of Breaking Up, Holidays are Hard to do: Divorce Reality Expert Nan Cohen Shares Tips for Surviving Separation

Share Article

Complications during the holiday season multiply for two-household families. Nan Cohen provides practical tactics for setting realistic expectations and finding joy despite separation or divorce.

Children--at the center of family holidays--are even more vulnerable during what is considered a happy time of year,” says Nan Cohen, divorce reality expert.

The realities of relationship break-ups are magnified around the holidays as families gather, traditions are shared, and children take center stage. Separation and divorce are never easy, but divorce reality expert Nan Cohen (http://www.divorcerealityexpert.com) believes self-awareness and maintaining realistic expectations support getting through the much-anticipated holiday season.

Cohen has tackled divorce-related topics for more than a decade on her radio show “Dealing with Divorce." Judith Patz, licensed marriage and family therapist, joins Nan to discuss season survival tactics on KDKA-TV (http://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com) for "Pittsburgh Today Live" on Mon., Nov. 21 at 9 a.m. and on "Dealing with Divorce" on Sat., Nov. 26 at 8:30 am. "Dealing with Divorce" airs on KQV-AM 1410 and is available at on Nan Cohen's Web site, http://www.divorcerealityexpert.com and http://www.kqv.com.

“Thanksgiving, Hanukkah and Christmas present special challenges,” says Cohen, a divorce consultant and coach (http://nanondivorce.com/services.php#div) focusing on personal and wellness concerns around separation and divorce. “Emotions bubble up and the typical tasks of travel plans, decorating, observing traditions, and even shopping can become overwhelming.”

Complications multiply for parents dealing with divorce, Cohen notes. A family network may include several sets of grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, and more. “Grandparents suffer a lot,” she says. “They may have even fewer hours with grandchildren when their adult child has divorced.”

“Children--at the center of family holidays--are even more vulnerable during what is considered a happy time of year,” says Cohen, speaking from experience. Her own painful divorce led to her to her own career niche—listening to others who are wading through the pain and confusion of broken relationships. She is passionate about the effects of divorce on children, who may be overlooked in the midst of parental disagreements and conflicts--long after the papers have been signed.

“Don’t complicate things by focusing on your circumstances,” observes Cohen, noting how easily emotions take hold and may be passed on to children. “Focus on the joys of the season, your kids and their happiness.”

Cohen shares her top three tips for those dealing with separation and divorce during holidays. http://nanondivorce.com/podcast1-20-11.php

Visit http://www.divorcerealityexpert.com for Nan’s Nine Holiday Tactics.

1.    Be good to yourself and others. Foremost, patience with one’s self is important for anyone dealing with a loss, says Cohen. “Keep positive, supportive people near you. Feeling good about yourself is so important, so screen out negative voices,” she says. Cohen’s advice includes building new networks and contacts—both professionally and socially.

2.    Put the kids in the spotlight. Be there for your children, your nieces, nephews, and the other children you know. “Let go of those simmering emotions,” says Cohen, “and focus on the joys and wonders of the season.”

3.    Create new traditions. “Make memories sharing things that are new and fun with your family and friends,” Cohen says. “You don’t have to eliminate past traditions, but you might have to include them in new ways.” Children need continuity, so those decoration, menorah or Christmas tree lighting can be especially important for the parent hosting children in a new location. “The things you do together will stick as memories, so do some baking, make hand-made gifts, or volunteer to help those in need,” she says. “Create quality time—with children and for yourself, and you’ll never regret time spent with your family or helping others.”

“The things you do together will stick as memories, so do some baking, make hand-made gifts, or volunteer to help those in need,” she says. “Create quality time—with children, for yourself. And you’ll never regret time spent with your family or helping others.”

ABOUT NAN COHEN TOTAL TALK
Nan Cohen is recognized as the go-to expert the realities of separation and divorce, based on her own experience and long-running radio show, "Dealing with Divorce" on http://www.kqv.com. After her marriage took a surprising turn and she found herself confronted with all of the emotions and logistics of divorce, Nan began to share what she had learned and discovered a niche in which she could help others work through a transition to a new beginning. Through NAN COHEN TOTAL TALK, she brings her practical, reality-based perspective and services to individuals through consulting with other divorce team professionals, one-on-one coaching, and audiences of her shows, seminars, and tools including her 2012 book, Reality Revealed, A Guide and Journal, for those navigating separation and divorce. http://www.divorcerealityexpert.com

# # #

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Yvonne Hudson
Visit website