P.A.N.T. Fund Drive Helps Homeless Cats

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P.A.N.T. is committed to resolving the stray and feral cat overpopulation crisis in Upstate New York through education, the humane and proven method of Trap/Neuter/Return (TNR), and adoption programs. In the past ten years P.A.N.T. has helped over 4,000 cats, significantly reduced the feral and stray cat population, and provided homeless cats with a much improved quality of life. The organization has initiated a fund drive to further its mission and expand its efforts in 2012.

In the past ten years P.A.N.T. has helped over 4,000 cats, and found loving families to adopt homeless kittens.

Attracting new volunteers and donors will be instrument to P.A.N.T.'s continuing success.

P.A.N.T. has initiated a fund drive to further its efforts to help the burgeoning feral cat population of upstate New York.

In 2010, Best Friends Animal Society, a nationally renowned animal advocacy organization and sanctuary, conducted a study of the feral cat population in the United States. Their report indicates that there are approximately 95,000 homeless cats in Dutchess County. These cats produce approximately 100,000 kittens each year and 25,000 of those kittens will survive to reach adulthood and begin breeding to add even further to the cat overpopulation crisis.    

In 2001, a grass roots, all-volunteer 501(c)(3) organization, P.A.N.T. was formed and is committed to resolving the stray and feral cat overpopulation crisis in Dutchess County through education, the humane and proven method of Trap/Neuter/Return (TNR), and adoption programs. In the past ten years P.A.N.T. has helped over 4,000 cats, significantly reduced the feral and stray cat population, and provided homeless cats with a much improved quality of life.

“Because unspayed and unneutered cats frequently mate, kittens are produced at an alarming rate,” says Juliet Powers, President of P.A.N.T. “Our organization spayed and neutered over 300 cats in 2010—nearly one per day. Assuming one-half of these cats are female, P.A.N.T. prevented the birth of approximately 1500 kittens last year.”

P.A.N.T. relies upon donations and grants to continue its efforts, and is seeking to raise funds to continue its work and provide other needed services. Its goals for 2012 include:

  •         Continue assisting feral and stray cats in the northern Dutchess area through TNR by spaying, neutering, rabies vaccinating, and providing them with appropriate shelter and a caretaker
  •      Continue to assist friendly strays and young kittens by placing them in foster homes until permanent homes can be found
  •      Establish several low cost spay/neuter clinics throughout the county to assist feral cats and low income families, and provide low-cost spay/neuter certificates
  •      Secure start-up funding to hire a veterinarian and support staff, and purchase medical equipment and a small van
  •      Initiate TNR programs in every community in Dutchess county

“Attracting new volunteers and donors will be instrument to our continuing success,” says Powers.

To make a donation or learn how to become a P.A.N.T. volunteer, please go to our site http://www.pant.org. Thank you in advance for any help or service you may give to our little friends.

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Juliet Powers
P.A.N.T.
845-486-7075
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