National EMS Academy Update in CPR Training Method: CPR-HD

Share Article

Acadian Companies’ National EMS Academy is updating the way they train Acadian medics to resuscitate cardiac arrest patients in the pre-hospital environment.

Acadian medics performing Hands-Only CPR

Hands-Only CPR

This new passive ventilation method eliminates mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, helps to decrease the spread of infection and, according to the American Heart Association, contributes to higher survival rates in cardiac arrest patients.

Acadian CompaniesNational EMS Academy is updating the way they train Acadian medics to resuscitate cardiac arrest patients in the pre-hospital environment. In addition to traditional CPR training, employees will learn a new method termed CPR-HD (“highly defined”) by Acadian Ambulance.

CPR-HD is based on the principles of “cardiocerebral resuscitation,” meaning high perfusion of the brain and vital organs. Traditional CPR and CPR-HD both follow the CAB (circulation, airway, breathing) recommendations, with CPR-HD being a more advanced method. This will be performed with a pit crew-type technique, having every treatment the medic provides timed and accurately performed according to Acadian’s protocol.

“The newer method ensures adequate and uninterrupted blood flow to the vital organs, including the heart and brain, thus making the patient’s chance of survival and eventual clinical outcomes much better,” reported Acadian Ambulance’s Lead Medical Director Dr. Chuck Burnell, MD.

When dispatchers provide self-help over the phone, they will instruct lay rescuers to use perform Hands-Only CPR, which is one hundred chest compressions per minute. This stimulation of vital blood circulation to the brain and organs during the first minutes of an arrest is crucial, easily performed, and virtually risk-free for the rescuer. Once on the scene, Acadian medics will perform CPR-HD.

Dr. Burnell also stressed Hands-Only CPR, the simplicity of the new technique, as a bystander method and encourages community members to seek local CPR training opportunities. “This new passive ventilation method eliminates mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, helps to decrease the spread of infection and, according to the American Heart Association, contributes to higher survival rates in cardiac arrest patients since the compressions are performed continuously,” said Dr. Burnell.
To see a demonstration of Hands-Only CPR, please visit http://www.acadiantv.com or download the high resolution version at http://www.acadian.tv/media/.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Keith Simon, Vice President PR/Marketing

Julie Mahfouz, PR/Marketing Manager
Visit website