Sugar’s the Real Cause of After-Meal Fatigue, According to Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin

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Researchers found that protein -- not sugar -- activates the cells responsible for keeping us awake and burning calories. Published in the scientific journal Neuron, the study has implications beyond hitting the wall, extending into obesity and sleep disorders.

The Doctors Health Press recommends that anyone looking to avoid these post-snack crashes, avoid the high-sugar, high-carbohydrate snacks like chocolate bars and candy and look for high protein snacks like hard-boiled eggs or hummus.

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As reported by Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, researchers have found that protein—not sugar—activates the cells responsible for keeping us awake and burning calories. Published in the scientific journal Neuron (Source: : Activation of central orexin/hypocretin neurons by dietary amino-acids," Neuron, Nov. 17, 2011.), the study has implications beyond hitting the wall, extending into obesity and sleep disorders. This study was recently reported by the Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin.

Wakefulness and energy expenditure rely on "orexin cells." These secrete a stimulant called "orexin" in the brain. When these unique cells aren't as active, it can result in sleepiness and weight gain.

Researchers compared what happens when different nutrients reach these orexin cells. They discovered that amino acids, which are nutrients found in proteins such as egg whites, stimulate orexin neurons much more than other nutrients do.

As reported in the Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin on Friday, November 18, 2011, (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/food-and-nutrition-articles/battling-the-afternoon-wall-through-food) scientists introduced different nutrients into the brains of mice, such as amino acid mixtures similar to egg whites, while tracking orexin cell impulses. It was then that they saw amino acids successfully stimulating orexin cells.

They have found also that sugar blocks orexin cells, which may help explain after-meal fatigue. So, they decided to look at interactions between sugar and protein. They found that amino acids stop glucose from blocking orexin cells. This may help explain why higher-protein meals can make people feel less calm and more alert than higher- carbohydrate meals.

The Doctors Health Press recommends that anyone looking to avoid these post-snack crashes, avoid the high-sugar, high-carbohydrate snacks like chocolate bars and candy and look for high protein snacks like hard-boiled eggs or hummus.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on the Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

David Juan, MD is the editor of The Vitamin Doctor newsletter that reveals some of the inside facts, including potential hazards, of today's popular world of vitamins and supplements. The Vitamin Doctor has released a new video revealing the foods that can have negative consequences when mixed with popular supplements. To see the video, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/foods-never-to-mix.

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