Air Force Officer Says in New Book “Rules of Chivalry for Nuclear War” : There’s Better Way to Fight Wars

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"Preventing civilian deaths is possible", says B-52 bomber engineer Albert W. Johnson

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We should not try to prevent war, but rather to promote more and better small wars conducted in accordance with mutually recognized rules of engagement.

The death of Muammar el-Qaddafi heralded, according to The New York Times, “a new American approach to war” – few if any troops on the ground, the heavy use of air power and a reliance on allies. A proud moment? Perhaps. But retired U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Albert W. Johnson questions a “new approach” that accepts the killing of civilians as a matter of course. He proposes a better way to fight, and has written a blueprint in a new book, “Rules of Chivalry for Nuclear War” (published by AuthorHouse).

Johnson was project officer in the development of the B-52 bomber, as well as one of the original team members on the Discoverer/Corona project – the nation’s first spy satellite program.

He passionately believes that the way we fight wars must change for humankind’s survival.

“We should not try to prevent war, but rather to promote more and better small wars conducted in accordance with mutually recognized rules of engagement,” Johnson says. “Better laws will not result in universal peace. Improved customs concerning the way we fight may result in a slightly better world.”

His Rules of Chivalry for Nuclear War (ROCNWAR, for short) ensure that civilians become the audience for a conflict and will not be harmed, make the aggressor’s sacrifice a certainty, and ultimately promote reconciliation and change.

The book “Rules of Chivalry for Nuclear War” is available online at Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. Follow him on Twitter @albertwjohnson and on his blog, albertjohnson.tumblr.com.

Author bio:
U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Albert W. Johnson knows warfare. After graduating from the Naval Academy, he was assigned as an armament officer in the last year of the Korean War. He then became project officer in developing the B-52 bomber and was one of the original team members on the Discoverer/Corona project – the nation’s first spy satellite program – later inducted into the Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers Hall of Fame. He earned a master’s degree from MIT and worked at Lockheed Corp., a leading defense contractor.

For a review copy or to contact the author:
Cindy Dashnaw, cdashnaw(at)bohlsenpr(dot)com, 317-602-7137 ext. 223

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Cindy Dashnaw
AuthorHouse
317-602-7137
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