65% of Workers Rate Their Boss as Less Than Inspiring

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The Global Institute for Inspiration (GII) commissioned a survey in the U.S. and the UK to determine how workers perceive bosses when it comes to inspiration. The survey was conducted by global digital market research specialist DigitalMR

The Global Institute for Inspiration (GII) commissioned a survey in the U.S. and the UK to determine how workers perceive bosses when it comes to inspiration. The survey was conducted by global digital market research specialist DigitalMR.

With an unemployment rate sitting near 10 percent in the U.S., people are doing all they can to find jobs — or keep their current ones. On the other side, it’s a challenging time for employers as well; many are doing all they can to keep their best talent feeling inspired so they don’t jump ship at the first sign of an economic recovery.

Latest findings, based on a poll 21st – 28th of November, by the Global Institute for Inspiration (GII) showed only 35% of workers find their boss inspiring. This is significant given recent research by GII that showed organizations with higher levels of inspiration also have significantly higher levels of employee satisfaction, commitment, engagement and trust – a necessity to sustain competitive advantage in any economy.

The global market research firm DigitalMR conducted the poll. Of the 8,851 total respondents, the vast majority of 4,590 respondents in the U.S. and 4261 in the UK seem to share the same general impression of their bosses... NOT INSPIRING.

In an earlier survey in 2010 of 1,000 Bosses, when asked how they would rate themselves on an inspiration scale between 1 and 10, 1 being lowest, 82% gave themselves a 7 or above.

"There is a huge disparity between how bosses perceive themselves versus how their direct reports perceive them when it comes to being inspiring. No boss wants to be thought of as less than inspiring”, says Terry Barber, CEO of the Global Institute for Inspiration (GII). “To help meet this need, we are launching experiential team and leadership development workshops designed to equip today's boss to perform like an inspiring leader and not just an efficient manager."

Other findings of the survey:

  •     Younger workers, age 16-34 were 16% more likely to find their boss inspiring than their baby boomer co-workers.
  •     Women were 10% more favorable than men in rating their boss as inspiring.

GII has established a National Inspiration Index (NII) for the first time. NII for the U.S. is a dismal 8.78% and somewhat gloomier for the U.K. at 0.62%.

Contact Terry Barber at The Global Institute for Inspiration(GII) at tbarber(at)giinspiration, 678-427-1107 for more information. Download the complete report at http://www.giinspiration.com

About GII:
GII is a research based learning and consultancy firm specializing in assisting organizations increase workplace and consumer inspiration leading to higher levels of engagement, innovation, and advocacy. Co-founder Terry Barber, CEO based in the U.S., heads GII.

About Digital MR:
DigitalMR is a specialist agency that provides a holistic approach to web based market research. It specializes in utilizing social media research, especially web-listening, and online communities to enhance its business consulting approach. The agency has pioneered new methods in online focus groups alongside tools such as video diaries, bulletin boards and online ethnography. DigitalMR is headed by founder and MD, Michalis Michael and has offices in London, UK, Nicosia, Cyprus, and Columbus, Ohio, in the USA.

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Michalis A. Michael
DigitalMR
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