The Consumer Justice Foundation Alerts the Public to a Bloomberg News Report Indicating That As Many as 10,000 Actos Side Effects Lawsuits Could Be Filed

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The Consumer Justice Foundation, a for-profit corporation whose URL can be found at http://www.sideeffectsrx.com, is staffed by professional consumer advocates who provide free online informational resources regarding the dangers of certain prescription medications. The CJF hereby alerts the public of a recent report in Bloomberg News that states that as many as 10,000 Actos side effects lawsuits could be filed against the drug’s manufacturer because of the number of people who have used Actos and developed bladder cancer.

If somebody had told me I could get cancer from Actos, I never would have taken it.

The Consumer Justice Foundation, a for-profit corporation whose team of professional consumer advocates follow the mission of providing the public with free online informational resources regarding the dangers of certain prescription medications, hereby alert the public of a recent report published in Bloomberg News that states that as many as 10,000 Actos side effects lawsuits could be filed against the drug’s manufacturers because of the number of people who have used this diabetes medication and developed bladder cancer.

The report, which appeared on the Bloomberg News Web site on November 30, states that based on the potential number of Actos side effects that could be filed along with the number of Actos bladder cancer lawsuits that have already been filed is leading federal judges to consider whether or not these claims should be consolidated in federal court.

The report further states that federal regulators in June analyzed the results of a manufacturer-sponsored review of the risks of developing Actos side effects and found that users faced an increased risk of developing bladder cancer, which is an extremely aggressive form of the disease. Actos, a diabetes medication, is manufactured by the Takeda Pharmaceutical Co., which is based in Japan and was also marketed by Eli Lilly & Company in the United States between 1999 and 2006.

Actos has already been removed from the markets of France and Germany, and the medication generated $4.8 billion in revenue for Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. in the last fiscal year. This amount represents more than 25 percent of the overall revenue generated by Takeda Pharmaceutical Company on an annual basis.

As one example, Terrence Allen filed a lawsuit against Takeda and Eli Lilly & Company after using Actos and developing bladder cancer. Mr. Allen has already undergone two surgical procedures to remove cancerous tissue from his bladder and will need another surgery after the New Year. This lawsuit is officially known as Terrence Allen v. Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America Inc., 11-cv-643, U.S. District Court for the Western District of New York (Buffalo). “If somebody had told me I could get cancer from Actos, I never would have taken it,” Mr. Allen said in an interview for this story.

About the Consumer Justice Foundation

The Consumer Justice Foundation, whose Web site can be found at http://www.consumerjusticefoundation.com, is a for-profit organization that serves two purposes for consumers: (1) to provide educational information regarding the policies and procedures of large corporations and how they affect the average consumer; and (2) to provide news updates and resources that continue to update consumers regarding developments taken by corporations that include pharmaceutical drug companies, auto manufacturers and insurance companies so that consumers who have been harmed can use these informational resources to connect to an experienced professional who can help them. The team at the Consumer Justice Foundation is staffed by experienced and passionate consumer advocates whose mission is to raise the awareness of issues that could pose a risk of harm to those who may not otherwise be aware of the dangers they face.

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Faith Anderson
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