Iraq: What's Next after the US Troop Withdrawal - A Discussion sponsored by The Century Foundation

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By the end of 2011, all U.S. combat forces will have been withdrawn from Iraq, ending eight years of a post-invasion occupation and transition that has seen Iraq beset by terrorist campaigns, sectarian violence, and crippled economic and governance structures. How can the international community assist Iraq through its recovery and reconstruction? What will the U.S. relationship with Iraq be after the military leaves? What conclusions might American policy makers and voters usefully draw from the experience in Iraq?

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You are invited to cover:

Iraq: What's Next after the U.S. Troop Withdrawal
A Discussion sponsored by The Century Foundation

When:         Thursday, December 15, 2011, 12:00p.m. – 1:45p.m.
Where:        The Century Foundation, 41 East 70th Street, New York, NY
Who:         James Dobbins, Director, International Security and Defense Policy Center
        RAND National Defense Research Institute
        Colonel Gian Gentile, Professor of Military History, United States Military
        Academy at West Point
        Ned Parker, Edward R. Murrow Press Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations;
        Foreign Correspondent, Los Angeles Times
        Michael Wahid Hanna, Fellow, The Century Foundation (Moderator).
Contact:         Christy Hicks, hicks(at)tcf(dot)org, 212-452-7723

        Seating is limited. Media seats will only be reserved for those who RSVP.

By the end of 2011, all U.S. combat forces will have been withdrawn from Iraq, ending eight years of a post-invasion occupation and transition that has seen Iraq beset by terrorist campaigns, sectarian violence, and crippled economic and governance structures. How can the international community assist Iraq through its recovery and reconstruction? What will the U.S. relationship with Iraq be after the military leaves? What conclusions might American policy makers and voters usefully draw from the experience in Iraq?

About the panelists:

James Dobbins-Ambassador James Dobbins is the director of the RAND International Security and Defense Policy Center. Dobbins has held State Department and White House posts including Assistant Secretary of State for Europe, Special Assistant to the President, Special Adviser to the President and Secretary of State for the Balkans, and Ambassador to the European Community. Dobbins has had numerous crisis management and diplomatic troubleshooting assignments as the Clinton and G.W. Bush administrations' special envoy for Afghanistan, Kosovo, Bosnia, Haiti, and Somalia. Diplomatic assignments include the withdrawal of American forces from Somalia, the American-led multilateral intervention in Haiti, the stabilization and reconstruction of Bosnia, and the NATO intervention in Kosovo. In the wake of September 11, 2001, he was named as the Bush administration's representative to the Afghan opposition with the task of putting together and installing a broadly based successor to the Taliban regime. He represented the United States at the Bonn Conference that established the new Afghan government, and, on December 16, 2001, he raised the flag over the newly reopened U.S. Embassy.

Colonel Gian Gentile-Colonel Gian P. Gentile directs the American History Program at the United States Military Academy at West Point. He received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in history from the University of California, Berkeley in 1986 and was commissioned through ROTC as second lieutenant of Armor. He has served in command and staff positions in the continental United States, Germany, and Korea. He has served in Iraq 2003 and 2006. In 2003 he was a Brigade Combat Team Executive Office in the 4th Infantry Division in Tikrit. In 2006 he commanded a Cavalry Squadron in the 4thInfantry Division in west Baghdad. He is a graduate of the Army’s School of Advanced Military Studies (SAMS) and he holds a doctorate in history from Stanford University. His book How Effective is Strategic Bombing? Lessons Learned from World War II to Kosovo, was published by New York University Press in 2000. He has had articles published in the Pacific Historical Review, Air Power History, Journal of Military History, Joint Forces Quarterly, Parameters, and Armed Forces Journal. He has also published numerous opinion articles in the Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, Washington Times, International Herald Tribune, and Army Times. He has been a visiting fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City.

Ned Parker-Ned Parker is the 2011-2012 Edward R. Murrow Press Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). He joined the Los Angeles Times in Baghdad in March 2007 and served as bureau chief there from spring 2009 to August 2011. This past winter and spring he reported from Egypt, Libya, and Bahrain on the popular uprisings sweeping the Middle East. He was the chief Baghdad correspondent for The Times of London from 2006 to 2007. He was previously based in Iraq from 2003 to 2005 as a reporter for Agence France-Presse. His reporting has taken him across the Arab world. He has written on Islamic militancy, regional politics, Iraq’s sectarian war, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Mr. Parker shared the 2006 Narrative Prize from Narrative Magazine for a new or emerging writer for two essays on Iraq and has also published in World Policy Journal. He was a 2010 finalist for the Bayeux-Calvados Award for War Correspondents.

Michael Hanna (Moderator)-Michael Hanna is a Fellow at The Century Foundation, where he focuses on issues of international security, human rights, post-conflict justice and U.S. foreign policy in the broader Middle East. He has served as a consultant for Human Rights Watch in Iraq and as a senior fellow at the International Human Rights Law Institute, where he conducted research on post-conflict justice, victims’ rights under international law, and the Iraqi High Criminal Court. From 1999 to 2004, Hanna practiced corporate law. Before law school he was a Fulbright Scholar in Cairo, Egypt where he undertook research on the relationship between Egyptian nationalism and Arab nationalism in the inter-war period.

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The Century Foundation conducts public policy research and analyses of economic, social, and foreign policy issues, including inequality, retirement security, election reform, media studies, homeland security, and international affairs. The foundation produces books, reports, and other publications, and convenes task forces and working groups. With offices in New York City and Washington, D.C., The Century Foundation is nonprofit and nonpartisan and was founded in 1919 by Edward A. Filene.

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Loretta Ahlrich

Christy Hicks