Tennessee Couple Join in CURE's effort to Raise Awareness of Hydrocephalus Around the World

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After their newborn son was born with hdyrocephalus, the Jackson's, a Tennesee couple, have started a fundraising campaign through CURE to help children around the world who suffer from hydrocephalus.

Eliot at six months

We are so blessed and grateful to have quality care so readily available for Eliot. Now we want to do whatever we can to share the plight of these children with others and help them receive the care they need.

Jeff and Elizabeth Jackson plan to join efforts with CURE to raise awareness and funds for children around the world who suffer from hydrocephalus.

The effort began after their fourth child, Eliot, was born with the life-threatening condition. Like most others in the U.S., the Jackson's have never heard of it, even though it is one of the most common conditions affecting the nervous systems of children around the world.
Hydrocephalus, sometimes called “water on the brain”, is a medical condition that develops when the normal flow and absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain is hindered or blocked resulting in excessive accumulation of fluid in the ventricles of the brain. It affects more than 400,000 newborns each year. Left untreated, in addition to pain and suffering, infant hydrocephalus leads to significant brain damage, severe developmental delay, blindness, and ultimately death.

The Jackson’s were fortunate to have access to top-quality care at Vanderbilt University Hospital. There, doctors quickly treated Eliot’s condition. Even though he has endured five surgeries to treat his hydrocephalus, his life was saved and his condition is improving.

But one day, the Jackson’s learned that not every child is as fortunate as Eliot. On their drive home from visiting him in the ICU, they heard a radio ad about CURE International Children's Hospital of Uganda that treats children suffering from hydrocephalus. “We were speechless. As soon as we got home we looked up more information. We are so impressed and drawn in by what CURE is doing,” said Elizabeth Jackson. “Our hearts break when we think of the mothers around the world who struggle to find care for their babies with hydrocephalus. We are so blessed and grateful to have quality care so readily available for Eliot. Now we want to do whatever we can to share the plight of these children with others and help them receive the care they need.”

The Jackson’s have created a fundraising effort in Eliot’s honor to support surgeries for children in Uganda. Learn more at http://cure.org/eliot

About CURE Hydrocephalus
CURE Hydrocephalus (CH) is committed to saving lives by eliminating untreated hydrocephalus and its preventable causes through training, treatment, and research. The primary focus of CURE Hydrocephalus is to train surgeons throughout the developing world to perform a shunt-less surgical technique based on the work and research of Dr. Benjamin C. Warf, who served as CURE Uganda's first medical director and is currently with Children's Hospital of Boston and Harvard Medical School.
Due to high birth rates, the lack of quality health care and tremendous poverty leading to issues such as malnutrition, the incidence of neonatal infection is higher in poor countries, which in turn leads to higher rates of hydrocephalus in infants.

For more information about CURE Hydrocephalus, go to http:// http://cure.org/hydrocephalus.
CURE Uganda

Located in Mbale, Uganda, CURE Uganda is a 40-bed children’s hospital with 100 employees including a staff of 4 doctors and 32 nurses who annually serve approximately 4,500 patients and perform 1,000 surgeries.
Over the last decade, CURE Uganda has provided life-saving treatment to more than 4,000 children. The hospital has emerged as the global leader and center of excellence for the treatment of children with hydrocephalus in the developing world.
To learn more about CURE, visit http://cure.org

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Lisa Wolf
lisa.wolf@cure.org
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