New Publication on Sulfur and Chloride in Soil and Plant at VolkerKleinhenz.com

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The Fertilization Website of Dr. agr. Volker Kleinhenz features a new publications on fertilization of crops with the K fertilizers potassium sulfate (sulphate of potash, K2SO4) and potassium chloride (muriate of potash, KCl). This booklet was commissioned by the International Potash Institute (IPI) which is supported by Germany's K+S Group which is one of the world's leading suppliers of standard and specialty fertilizers.

Besides his Curriculum vitae, a number of presentations developed during his employment for scientific, commercial and rural-development companies, and several packages of cultivation practices for different crops, the Fertilization Website of Dr. agr. Volker Kleinhenz covers his scientific publications from 1991. In 1999 he authored a booklet on fertilization of crops with the K fertilizers potassium sulfate (sulphate of potash, K2SO4) and potassium chloride (muriate of potash, KCl). This booklet was commissioned by the International Potash Institute (IPI) which is supported by Germany's K+S Group which is one of the world's leading suppliers of standard and specialty fertilizers.

Secure food supply is a basis for economic, social and cultural development, and for political stability. To match future food demand, food production must be dramatically increased. It is projected that the world population will increase to 8.2 billion people by the year 2025, a 53-percent increase from 1990. A majority of the future world population will live in tropical regions such as sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia with more than 50 percent in Asian countries. Increased food production may only be achieved by intensification of production on existing agricultural land. This will widen the gap between removal of plant nutrients by crop uptake and nutrient release in soils by mineralization. To close the gap, nutrients must be applied in the form of fertilizers or manures. The more intensive the crop production, the more likely is the use of inorganic fertilizers.

Sulfur deficiency is becoming widespread and is emerging as an important constraint in crop production worldwide. S is now recognized as the fourth major plant nutrient and it can be expected that with increasing intensification of agriculture, demand for S will soon outstrip supply. This is particularly true for the Asian countries like India, Bangladesh, Thailand, China, the Philippines, Indonesia , and the South Pacific Islands. There are multiple reasons for S deficiencies such as increased crop yield levels through breeding, better control of S emissions from industrial and domestic fuel burning, use of low-S high analysis fertilizers, and decreasing applications of organic manures and S-containing pesticides.

Potassium sulfate (sulfate of potash, K2SO4) is not only a good source of immediately plant-available S for the numerous crops worldwide, but also has a number of advantages over the usual and more cheaply available K fertilizer, potassium chloride (muriate of potash, KCl): (1) it carries two major plant nutrients, (2) it has a lower salt index, (3) it is preferable for chloride-sensitive crops, and (4) it improves quality of many crops.

Chloride is considered a micronutrient since most plants require only trace amounts of Cl to meet their physiological requirements. However, for some species Cl is essential for maintaining certain processes. More commonly, chloride is associated with detrimental effects on soil salinity, salt intolerant crops, and crops which a vulnerable to Cl-toxicity.

The booklet on Sulfur and Chloride in the Soil-Plant System at VolkerKleinhenz.com focuses on (1) the processes which sulfur and chloride are subject to in soils, (2) processes which determine availability of sulfur and chloride and their absorption by plants, and (3) physiological and metabolic functions of sulfur and chloride in plants. In these veins, it incorporates the latest available information on production of a large number of crops to provide examples for the processes which sulfur and chloride undergo in the soil-plant system, their functions in plants and how this affects productivity and quality of agricultural produce, and sustainability of agricultural land.

Besides providing an overview of his scientific publications, Volker's homepage includes a continuously updated Curriculum vitae. Besides his recent assignments as a referee for the premium international agricultural journal Scientia Horticulturae and the Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics (JARTS), it also includes his latest consultation on Supplier Quality Management.

These details are also available at Volker Kleinhenz's LinkedIn profile, his homepage at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) in Thailand and his Twitter account @VolkerKleinhenz.

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