Fluency Expert Available To Discuss Best Picture Oscar Winner The King’s Speech

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Expert Can Discuss Significance Of The Acclaim For Those Who Stutter

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Fluency Expert Available To Discuss Best Picture Oscar Winner
The King’s Speech

Film Took Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Director, and Best Original Screenplay Awards Last Night At The Oscars

Expert Can Discuss Significance Of The Acclaim For Those Who Stutter

Editors: Tommie L. Robinson, Jr., Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Immediate Past President of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, is a fluency expert with many years of experience treating people who stutter.

VIDEO CLIPS OF DR. ROBINSON SPEAKING ABOUT THE KING’S SPEECH AND STUTTERING

  •     Effectiveness of the Therapy Techniques Used in The King’s Speech
  •     Why The King’s Speech is such an Important Movie
  •     The Impact an SLP [Speech-Language Pathologist] has on a Person who Stutters
  •     The King’s Speech has Many Important Benefits

STUTTERING IMPEDES COMMUNICATION: More than 3 million people in the United States stutter. Stuttering affects the fluency of speech. It begins during childhood and, in some cases, lasts throughout life. The disorder is characterized by disruptions in the production of speech sounds, also called "disfluencies." In most cases, stuttering has an impact on at least some daily activities. Some people may limit their participation in certain activities.

Such "participation restrictions" often occur because the person is concerned about how others might react to disfluent speech. The impact of stuttering on daily life can be affected by how the person and others react to the disorder.

Most treatment programs for people who stutter are "behavioral." They are designed to teach the person specific skills or behaviors that lead to improved oral communication. For instance, many speech-language pathologists teach people who stutter to control and/or monitor the rate at which they speak. In addition, people may learn to start saying words in a slightly slower and less physically tense manner. They may also learn to control or monitor their breathing. When learning to control speech rate, people often begin by practicing smooth, fluent speech at rates that are much slower than typical speech, using short phrases and sentences. Over time, people learn to produce smooth speech at faster rates, in longer sentences, and in more challenging situations until speech sounds both fluent and natural. "Follow-up"or "maintenance" sessions are often necessary after completion of formal intervention to prevent relapse.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Kimberly O’Sullivan, ASHA Public Relations Manager, office (301) 296-8715, cell (301) 987-8420 or E-mail at kosullivan(at)asha(dot)org

Joseph Cerquone, ASHA Public Relations Director, cell (703) 973-7744 or E-mail jcerquone(at)asha(dot)org

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