Rarity Increases Value According to Royal Wedding Collectibles Expert

Share Article

Royal wedding collectibles expert Stephen Church says while it cannot be guaranteed that a particular piece of Will and Kate memorabilia will become a high value collectible, serious collectors should look for limited edition pieces crafted by well-established producers known for superior quality.

Royal commemoratives expert Stephen Church believes this Royal Wedding Lion’s Head Vase is highly collectible based on its high quality and very limited production.

Royal commemoratives expert Stephen Church believes this Royal Wedding Lion’s Head Vase is highly collectible based on its high quality and very limited production.

Makers like Royal Worcester, the Royal Collection, and Halcyon Days are recognized for their superior quality and are therefore highly collectible...Any limited edition piece produced by companies such as these is a sound investment.

Stephen Church, fifth generation managing director of Church’s China, says Royal Wedding memorabilia collectors often ask which pieces he believes will appreciate in value over time. While there is no definitive answer to the question, he notes, memorabilia produced in very limited quantities is most likely to increase in value over time.

Church, who has more than 40 years of experience in Royal Wedding Commemoratives, says, “I always tell my customers to make their choices from the heart. First and foremost, select pieces based on their aesthetic value and personal meaning. That said, it is more likely an artisan piece produced in very small numbers will attain collector status before mass-produced items such as the ubiquitous Royal Wedding tea towel.”

152-year-old Church’s China is the longest operating retailer of Royal Wedding Commemoratives in the U.K. It is currently offering more than 80 pieces of Royal Engagement and Royal Wedding Memorabilia, ranging from silver plate champagne flutes and hip Jan Constantine cushions to fine bone china, on its online sales division The U.K. Gift Company.

Church says one piece he predicts will become highly collectible is the Royal Worcester’s Lion’s Head Vase, produced in a very limited edition of 250. Developed in association with one of England’s leading ceramicists, William Edwards, the English Bone China vase stands six inches tall and is finished in 22 carat gold. Each vase is made and hand decorated in England, featuring a specially-commissioned portrait of Prince William and Catherine Middleton.

Church adds that a piece’s quality significantly adds to its potential. “Makers like Royal Worcester, the Royal Collection, and Halcyon Days are recognized for their superior quality and are therefore highly collectible,” Church says. “They have been making collectible pieces in England for hundreds of years, earning an indomitable reputation for excellence. Any limited edition piece produced by companies such as these is a sound investment.”

Royal Worcester, one of England’s oldest fine porcelain makers, has been in business since 1751. Prior to the founding of Royal Worcester, fine porcelain was manufactured exclusively in the Far East. In the mid-1700s, physician John Wall and apothecary William Davis began experimenting with their own porcelain recipe. Ultimately achieving success, they joined forces with 13 other local businessmen to open the first Royal Worcester porcelain factory in Worcester, England.

The company earned a reputation for producing extremely high quality china and soon became a porcelain maker of choice for England’s upper class and the Royal Family. The company celebrated its 250th Anniversary in 2001 which included a visit from Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh. In 2009, Royal Worcester was acquired by Portmeirion Pottery. Royal Worcester fine porcelain is now made in an independent factory in Stoke-on-Trent, the heart of the English ceramic industry.

Established in 1858, Church’s China sells a wide range of china and other collectibles. Specializing in royal commemorative memorabilia, the company has locations in Northampton and Market Harborough, England as well as an online division, The U.K. Gift Company. For more information, visit http://www.theukgiftcompany.com.

Media Note: If you would like to arrange for a telephone interview with Stephen Church, please contact Nancy Marshall at nmarshall(at)marshallpr(dot)com or Jennifer Boes at jboes(at)marshallpr(dot)com. Mr. Church will also be available for live interviews in New York City at some point in March 2011. If you are interested, please follow up with Nancy or Jen at the emails above.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Anna McDermott
Visit website