‘The Black Book’ by Sen. Adlai E. Stevenson III Calls for Return to Reason and Civility in Politics

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Five generations helped shape American politics

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“We need to restore reason and the democratic dialogue, the America my family knew and served, an America that was an inspiration in an expectant world now grown skeptical,” Stevenson says.

Americans who yearn for a return to reason, civility and democratic dialogue have an informed advocate in Sen. Adlai E. Stevenson III. His just-released The Black Book recalls five generations of political wisdom gained from experience on the ground and in the world during many of the most significant events in the country’s history.

Named for a family binder that expanded over the generations as a source of wit and wisdom for speeches, The Black Book begins in central Illinois with great-great-grandfather Jesse Fell, the man who proposed the Lincoln-Douglas debates, promoted Lincoln’s presidential candidacy and organized Illinois’ delegation to the 1860 Republican Convention for Lincoln.

It ends in modern China, first visited by Stevenson in 1975, and an epilogue on the life cycle of nations and empires.

Stevenson, now 80, contrasts the values that created America with those that undermine it in today’s interdependent, dynamic, nuclear world. The Black Book recalls an America bursting with political energy and idealism, leading an international effort to create a world order based on law, cooperation and development assistance. Democracy was a means of informing American citizens – not a path to power – and service to country and community was every citizen’s duty.

Immersed in government and a peripatetic student of the world from childhood, Stevenson sees America’s challenge today as its politics. He aims to remind readers what our politics was, what it is what it can be.

“We need to restore reason and the democratic dialogue, the America my family knew and served, an America that was an inspiration in an expectant world now grown skeptical,” Stevenson says.

Today, as chairman of the Adlai Stevenson Center on Democracy at the family home near Libertyville, Ill., Stevenson aims to bring practitioners from around the world together to address systemic challenges to democratic systems.

“We must learn from each other in this interconnected world; many countries are doing a better job of informing their publics. Their politics are not drenched in money.”

Stevenson observes that despite the metamorphosis of American politics, many courageous, sensible men and women are still prepared to lay down their political lives for their country. He dedicates The Black Book to them with the hope that they gain some “amusement, nourishment and strength from its bits of wisdom.”

The Black Book
Published in the United States by Adlai E. Stevenson III, Chicago
Copyright 2009
ISBN 978-0-9823710-0-08
Available online at Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com, Borders.com

CONTACT:
Cindy Dashnaw
BohlsenPR
cdashnaw(at)bohlsenpr(dot)com
317.602.7137 ext. 223

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Cindy Dashnaw
AuthorHive
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