Heartland Institute Experts React Ethanol Resistance in Germany

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This week, Germany’s Economy Minister Rainer Bruederle announced plans to move ahead with the country’s introduction of ten per cent ethanol (E10) fuel blends. The plan is running into increasing resistance from German motorists, who fear damage to their famously purring engines.

Burning food for fuel makes as much sense as reducing our effort to create shelter around the world with wooden structures so that we might burn more wood for fuel.

-- Jay Lehr, Science Director, The Heartland Institute

This week, Germany’s Economy Minister Rainer Bruederle announced plans to move ahead with the country’s introduction of ten per cent ethanol (E10) fuel blends. The plan is running into increasing resistance from German motorists, who fear damage to their famously purring engines.

Resistance to ethanol mandates is also on the rise in the United States, especially as food prices continue to rise.

The following statements from Heartland Institute experts on energy and environmental policy may be used for attribution:

“There may be many technical reasons for not using ethanol but the most important reason not to make it is that it has virtually no impact on reducing our need for petroleum in our automobiles and simply raises the price of food around the world. Without ridiculous government subsidies to cavorts investors the ethanol industry would shut down as it should.

“Burning food for fuel makes as much sense as reducing our effort to create shelter around the world with wooden structures so that we might burn more wood for fuel. Long before we properly refined gasoline Henry Ford did use ethanol in his first cars. We do not need to do this anymore.”

Jay Lehr
Science Director
The Heartland Institute
jlehr(at)heartland(dot)org
312/377-4000

“In a federal government riddled with far too many pork-barrel projects and special-interest kickbacks, ethanol subsidies and mandates nevertheless stand out for their expense, wastefulness, and political mischief. Ethanol raises fuel prices, decreases fuel mileage, devastates water resources, tightens food supplies, and increases a wide variety of pollutants vis-a-vis gasoline. For all these harmful impacts, what benefits are gained other than currying favor with special interests?”

James M. Taylor
Senior Fellow, Environment Policy
The Heartland Institute
jtaylor(at)heartland(dot)org
941/776-5690

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Jim Lakely