The Center for Regenerative Medicine has now Developed a New Non-surgical Technique for Treatment of Osteo-Arthritis of the Knee

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Muscular-skeleton, joint injuries and arthritis affect over 100 million Americans, or one in every three people. A majority of these people develop chronic problems and disability.

Knee pain is the most common pathology seen at the center for regeneerative Medicine.

These cells allow the body to take advantage of the normal healing pathways at a greatly accelerated rate. During the healing process, the body rushes many cells and cell-types to the injected area in order to accelerate the healing process.

Miami Beach, FL The Center for Regenerative Medicine in Miami Beach, Florida, concentrates on helping arthritic and injured people to get back to a functional level of life and their activities using non-surgical techniques and orthopedic medicine. The center's expertise is in treatment of conditions of the spine, knees, shoulders and other cartilage damages.

According to NIH (National Institute of Health), joint injuries and arthritis affect over 100 million Americans, or one in every three people; a majority of these people develop chronic problems and disability. Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD) or commonly known as Arthritis (in Latin 'arth' means joint, 'itis' means inflammation) is not just an isolated problem, but more like an epidemic as the aging population lives longer. DJD consists of more than 100 different conditions. These can be anything from relatively mild forms of tendinitis (as in 'tennis elbow') and bursitis to crippling systemic forms, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Autologous (autologous refers to cells, tissues or even growth factors that are re-implanted in the same individual, in other words a patient receives his or her own cells) cell therapy injections is a by-product of blood that is rich in growth factors and platelets.

Dr. A. J. Farshchian, the medical director for The Center for Regenerative Medicine explains, "Until now, cell therapy's use has been confined to the hospital setting. This was due mainly to the cost of separating the cells from the blood and the large amount of blood needed to produce a suitable quantity of cells. New technology permits the doctor to harvest and produce a sufficient quantity of cells from only 30-50 cc of blood drawn from the patient while they are in the office setting. It takes about 20 minutes to harvest these cells prior to injection.

"These cells allow the body to take advantage of the normal healing pathways at a greatly accelerated rate. During the healing process, the body rushes many cells and cell-types to the injected area in order to accelerate the healing process." Dr. Farshchian further adds that, "These cells perform many functions, including release of growth factors (GF) into the diseased or arthritic and injured sites. Another main function is attracting Mesenchymal Stem Cells to the damaged area. These growth factors (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor VEGF1, Platelet Derived Growth Factors PDGF, Insulin-Like Growth Factor ILGF and Transforming Growth Factor Beta TGF) function to assist the body in repairing itself by stimulating stem cells to regenerate new tissue. The more growth factors released sequestered into the damaged cells, the more stem cells stimulated to produce new host tissue. Thus, one can easily see that cell therapy and its applications for injection in to the joints and tendons to improve osteoarthritis and sports injuries."

Currently A. J. Farshchian M.D. has used cell therapy for pain and arthritis of the knee, shoulder, spine, hip, ankle, wrist and elbow at The Center For Regenerative Medicine for over 5 years. For more information visit their website at http://www.arthritisusa.net.

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