“9,000 Cars” Removed from the Road through Environmental Stewardship

Share Article

Today the State Electronics Challenge announced that its Partners removed the equivalent of 9,000 cars from the road through environmental stewardship of electronics. Partners achieved these results by purchasing “green” computers, activating power management settings on computers and monitors to save energy, and responsibly recycling equipment.

Today the State Electronics Challenge (http://www.stateelectronicschallenge.net) announced that its Partners removed the equivalent of 9,000 cars from the road through environmental stewardship of electronics. Partners achieved these results by purchasing “green” computers, activating power management settings on computers and monitors to save energy, and responsibly recycling equipment.

The State Electronics Challenge is a free program that works with public entities throughout the United States—including state, regional, tribal, and local government, state colleges and universities and school districts— to decrease the environmental footprint of their computer equipment. Currently 63 public entities with a combined total of more than 70,000 employees are Challenge Partners.    

“As a result of being a Partner and the support offered by the Challenge, the state of Maine has significantly changed the way it manages its computer equipment. The Challenge helped the state set priorities and bring key functions together to make significant changes that resulted in direct environmental benefits as well as cost savings,” said Peter Cooke, Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

This year, for the third year in a row, the State of Maine received Silver recognition for its accomplishments with green procurement and end-of-life management. Each year Partners are eligible for recognition at one of three levels – bronze, silver, or gold, based on their accomplishments.

Other Partners receiving recognition are Manitou Springs School District, Colorado – Gold; Providence, Rhode Island School Department – Gold (for the second time); Town of Windsor, Connecticut – Silver (for the second time); and the Regional Technology Program State College, Pennsylvania – Silver (Bronze last year).

“With the guidance provided by the State Electronics Challenge, the Providence School Technology Department has followed their lead keeping with the mindset of “Going Green.” It has proven to be a huge success in our district and more importantly for the environment itself. Providence Schools will continue to strive to meet the environment’s needs.”

Over the past three years the combined Partner actions have resulted in energy savings equivalent to the energy to power almost 9,000 U.S. homes per year, and avoided greenhouse gases equivalent to removing over 8,900 cars from the road. Furthermore, more than 300 tons of hazardous waste was avoided.

These accomplishments were the results of buying almost 30,000 “green” computers as defined by the EPEAT® environmental performance standard, and recycled over 20,000 computers and monitors.

Challenge Partners come in all sizes, ranging from the entire Maine state government to cities such as Lansing, Michigan, state environmental agencies, school districts, universities, colleges, and regional programs. For the current list of Partners, visit http://stateelectronicschallenge.net/current_partners.html

The opportunity to offer this program and technical assistance free-of-charge throughout the U.S. stems from the sponsorship of the Challenge by the private sector–including Samsung, ISRI, Panasonic, Sims Recycling Solutions, and the Consumer Electronics Association, according to Lynn Rubinstein, Executive Director of the Northeast Recycling Council, and Program Manager for the Challenge program.

For more information, contact Lynn Rubinstein, Northeast Recycling Executive Director and Challenge Program Administrator, 802-254-3636, or visit the Challenge Website at http://www.stateelectronicschallenge.net.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Lynn Rubinstein
Visit website