Deep Root Partners Observes Arbor Day And Promotes Sustainable Tree Care for Urban Areas

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Deep Root Partners, L.P. observes Arbor Day 2011 and honors visionary municipalities that are rethinking the vital role trees play in the health of our planet and population. The company provides the Silva Cell, a modular building block for promoting tree growth and green environments.

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DeepRoot wants to hear about your goals for growing healthy trees in your community. If you would like to be recognized or contacted, please email us.

Deep Root Partners, L.P. observes Arbor Day 2011 and honors visionary municipalities that are rethinking the vital role trees play in the health of our planet and population. Deep Root is an urban landscape products and services supplier whose mission is to help restore ecosystem services in urban areas using green utilities such as trees, soil and stormwater.

With over 50 percent of the world’s population living in cities, more and more trees on our streets and elsewhere in our communities need active care and careful planning. Mature trees contribute significantly to healthier air, water and public health in cities.

Studies have found that trees surrounded by pavement in most North American urban downtown centers live an average of 13 years. This short lifespan deprives communities most in need of benefits that trees can provide. A large tree with a trunk diameter of 30” delivers up to 70 times the ecological services of a small tree with a 3” trunk diameter, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

Deep Root works directly with international communities that are making the greatest strides toward pro-tree policies, providing solutions that enable trees to thrive in the built environment. Among other products and services, they are the providers of the Silva Cell, a modular building block for delivering soil volumes to trees under paving like sidewalks and parking lots.

“We want to recognize the people who are actively advancing the critical role that trees play in the future sustainability and livability of our cities. They take action every day by promoting policies and projects that set trees up for long-term success and ecological contribution,” said Graham Ray, executive vice-president of Deep Root.

Deep Root identifies these ten communities for their projects and policies that are redefining requirements for urban tree soil, stormwater management and built-environment conditions:

  •     Baltimore Waterfront Healthy Harbor Initiative – This initiative sets an example for increasing the tree canopy as a way to preserve the environment and manage stormwater. Using permeable paving, landscaping, rain gardens or green roofs, it asks for sites to filter more than 50 percent of stormwater runoff from areas.
  •     University of Florida (IFAS Extension) – The project created an Urban Design for a Wind Resistant Urban Forest. Planners increased the soil and depth requirements to allow trees to mature and live longer.
  •     West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection - The community created a municipal handbook to manage wet weather through specific green infrastructure.
  •     Athens-Clarke County, Georgia - The community created best management practices for community tree planting. It also gave credit to the Sacramento Tree Foundation for “Tree Basics.”
  •     State of Minnesota Sustainable Building Guidelines (MSBG) – Where trees are planted in hard surfaces, the community uses a structural soil media mix of minimum soil volume of 500 cubic feet (cf) per tree. If soil volumes cannot be met it is recommended that trees be planted in minimum 8' wide by approximately 3' deep trenches so that small soil volumes per tree become "interconnected."
  •     Charlotte, North Carolina & Mecklenburg County – Planners amended the planting area requirements and recommendations for commercial development. They increased the absolute minimum soil volume and planting area per tree.
  •     Aspen, Colorado & Pitkin County – The community amended its structural soils specifications. Soil area is now based on a mature tree size, which requires 30 inches or more depth for growth.
  •     Chicago Landscape Ordinance – The city amended planting standards and now requires soil to have a three foot minimum depth. Planting areas shall have a minimum of 24 square feet of surface area with no dimension less than three feet.
  •     Denver Parks and Recreation Forestry Department – The city created a “Street Tree Plan Review Checklist.” It includes tree-friendly requirements for new hardscape or re-constructed hardscape areas (non tree lawn areas).
  •     Emeryville, California -- The community set new soil and planting standards for small, medium, and large tree species.

Should your city or town be on this list? DeepRoot wants to hear about your goals for growing healthy trees in your community. If you would like to be recognized or contacted, please email us at RethinkTrees(at)deeproot(dot)com.

About Deep Root Partners, LP:
Deep Root Partners, LP is an urban landscape products manufacturer and services supplier whose aim is to help restore ecosystem services in urban areas using green utilities, such as trees, soil and stormwater. Its leading product line is the Silva Cell, a modular building block for promoting tree growth and green environments. Founded in 1976, Deep Root is now a leading company with passion for enhancing the built environment through design and use of innovative and quality products.

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Leda Marritz
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