Women Want Tougher Drink Drive Limit

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Women favour a tougher drink drive limit than the current legal limit of 0.08% of BAC (Breath Alcohol Content). A survey by AlcoSense found that women favour reducing the legal drink drive limit more strongly than men. While nearly half of men (48%) would leave the legal limit where it is only a little over a fifth (22%) of women are happy with the law as it stands

Women favour a tougher drink drive limit than the current legal limit of 0.08% of BAC (Breath Alcohol Content). A survey by AlcoSense found that women favour reducing the legal drink drive limit more strongly than men. While nearly half of men (48%) would leave the legal limit where it is only a little over a fifth (22%) of women are happy with the law as it stands.

Almost 2 out of 5 women (39%) would like to see a zero tolerance limit; while less than 1 in 4 men (24%) support this. A further one in three women support reducing the drink drive limit to 0.05% of BAC (compared to one in four men).

The survey also showed that women were more worried than men that the current cuts to police budgets will lead to more drink driving. Three out of four women (76%) believed the cuts would affect police efforts to catch drink drivers. Fewer men, seven out of ten men (67%), expressed a similar concern. Women also feared the consequences of the cuts far more than men. Almost nine out of ten women (87%) feared it would encourage more drink drivers compared to seven out of ten men (72%).

Men appear to be more reckless as 61% admitted to having driven while close to or over the drink drive limit compared to only 37% of women.

“The survey results show a distinct difference in attitudes between men and women. Women seem more sensible or cautious in their approach to drink driving and perhaps also more concerned about the consequences both wanting a lower drink drive limit and fearing the consequences of the public spending cuts on police drink drive efforts,” said Hunter Abbott, Managing Director of AlcoSense.

There was little difference between the sexes in their views on raising the legal driving age. 68% of women and 63% of men felt that 17 is too young for first-time drivers. Two out of five men (43%) and nearly half of all women (46%) of women felt it should be raised to 18; while nearly 1 in 5 of both sexes felt it should be raised to 21.

The survey also showed that although more men knew how long it takes the body to process a unit of alcohol (48% to 39%) women were more able to judge correctly what time the next day they would be free from alcohol with 53% of women assessing this accurately compared to only 39% of men.

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Kevin Monks