The Laurence Miller Gallery Presents its Third Annual Summer Exhibition, Past (Present) Future III, Opening in New York City on June 6th

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A photography exhibition featuring recent work by gallery artists, highlights from our previous shows, and a preview the season to come.

We have chosen to devote our summer schedule to the best from our shows of the past year and to work that is either brand new or has not yet been shown in a gallery context.

Opening Monday June 6 Laurence Miller Gallery will present its third annual summer exhibition, Past (Present) Future III. The exhibition features recent work by gallery artists, highlights from our previous shows, and a preview of the season to come. Please note our new summer hours: Monday through Thursday 10-5:30.

Two of the most frequently asked questions during gallery exhibitions are: "Did I miss the (fill-in-the-blank) show?" and "What is your next show?" PPF III answers those questions. Because it is virtually impossible to see everything one wants in New York we have chosen to devote our summer schedule to the best from our shows of the past year and to work that is either brand new or has not yet been shown in a gallery context. The emphasis this year will be on search and discovery, and what’s new, with most of the artwork being part of a body of work that is just beginning to emerge from the artist's repertoire.

Simone Rosenbauer, featured in the recent cutting edge exhibition reGeneration at APERTURE, travels Australia in search of small private museums. Her Surfboard Museum is a whimsical study of cultural preservation. Ray K. Metzker explores his home neighborhood in search of marvelous reflections on cars, which he calls his “Autowackies.” Stephane Couturier's brilliantly colored building façades from Brasilia and Barcelona employ digital technology to create architecture we could not discover otherwise. While cruising around the barren regions of west Texas, Burk Uzzle arose at sunset to capture the stark and quiet temple to consumerism, a Prada store replica near Marfa. Jessica Backhaus continues her search for the traces of our lives and our loves, photographing intimate objects like super-saturated clothespins and converting them into Oldenburg-like objects. Denis Darzacq captures people aloft contrasted against carpeting and toiletries. DoDo Jin Ming transforms the sea into mysterious abstractions printed on handmade paper. And Toshio Shibata's zen-like images taken at night reveal what the eye cannot see.

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Vicki Harris
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