Will Buckingham Palace Answer the Royal Call, with Meetupcall.com?

Share Article

Meetupcall.com has offered Buckingham Palace free conference calling for up to a year so that the Queen can keep tabs on her favourite princes.

Due to the complete lack of effort required on my behalf to set a conference call up and having no complaints from my MD after the call, we've been more than happy to stay with Meetupcall.com and their great service.

So far as wedding preparations go, the matrimonial union of Prince William and Kate Middleton easily takes the biscuit; assuming, that is, the biscuit were of the inordinately expensive variety found several shelves above Rich Teas, Jammie Dodgers and Hobnobs at a plush Waitrose outlet that curiously charges all non-shoppers for the items of those walking down the aisle. Quite aside from worrying about how the recession-hit proles might finance the big day, however, Buckingham Palace has every reason to feel anxious over the Royal Wedding; indeed, what might become of young William once he marries the new people’s princess?

In all probability, William and Kate will go about their post-wedding lives as if the protracted and very public period of betrothal were but a strange dream that ended with a sizeable proportion of the population entitling themselves to a day off work.

Probability, however, is boring. What people really want to know is how Buckingham Palace might cope if Kate Middleton decides to dig in her claws and tear the beloved prince away from the royal circle. Would Prince Philip give the nod to his pals in the secret service? Would the Queen send in the Corgis? Would a miserable Harry swap Clarence House for the farthest outpost of Afghanistan? Would Charles notice? Fearing the worst, Meetupcall.com, a teleconferencing firm based in the UK, has waded into the hypothetical quagmire with an enviably practical solution.

Meetupcall.com has offered Buckingham Palace free conference calling for up to a year so that the Queen can keep tabs on her favourite princes. With Kate likely to be dragging William around the world on the matrimonial bandwagon and Harry’s recent promotion to captain in the British Army unlikely to see him twiddling his thumbs at home, teleconferencing would seem both a sensible and cost-effective alternative to, say, pigeon courier. In return, Meetupcall.com requires one little task to be undertaken by the heads of state: the firm has asked that feedback of its service be left on TrustPilot.com. Failing that, the teleconferencing company would be content with an official Royal stamp of approval.

A spokesperson for Meetupcall.com explained: “Teleconferencing is fast becoming an essential mode of communication in the digital age. Considering that William and Harry seem destined to spend time away from home in the near future, we thought we’d give Buckingham Palace an opportunity to keep in touch with the princes while testing our service in the process”.

TrustPilot.com, a website that gathers user data to provide ratings of third-party sites, was recently used by Meetupcall.com to obtain feedback from its customers. Although TrustPilot.com has the power to ruin a company’s online reputation, Meetupcall.com took the somewhat risky step to ask its customers to leave feedback on the site. Fortunately, the decision paid off for the teleconferencing firm, with customers leaving an assortment of favourable quotes, several of which are highlighted below. The question is: will the Royal Family soon be adding its penny’s worth?

Testimonials:

  • "Fantastic service, I highly recommend." - John from London.
  • "This was a great service to have and continued to use. It makes it so easy to teleconference and even records the calls so I can listen to them later." - Natasha from London
  • "Due to the complete lack of effort required on my behalf to set a conference call up and having no complaints from my MD after the call, we've been more than happy to stay with Meetupcall.com and their great service." - Flo from Cambridge

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Simon Moxon
Visit website