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Be the first to see the new Houston Museum of Natural Science Paleontology Hall

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With the addition of the incredible new paleontology hall, HMNS strives to become even more fascinating and educational for our guests.

Take part in helping to build one of the most dynamic Paleontology Halls in the world at the Houston Museum of Natural Science—larger than a football field. Become a member now and own 30-thousand square feet of pure paleontological wonder, baring its fangs in Summer 2012. Besides seeing the brand-new hall before it opens to the public next year, new and renewing members will receive an extra three months of membership free, for a limited time only, as well as enjoy behind-the-scenes, special-access events all summer.

Embark on a Prehistoric Safari
The innovative hall packed with prehistoric beasts will not have displays of ancient skeletons in a row as visitors are accustomed to viewing. The predators and prey in the new paleontology hall will be in action—chasing, eating and escaping as they struggle for life. Embark on a prehistoric safari that takes you from the grand saga of human evolution, from tree-climbing australopithecines to courageous mammoth-hunters. Along this journey visitors will see:

  •     More than 50 new, mounted fossil skeletons including 24 dinosaurs all in “action” poses
  •     An all-bone T.rex featuring the best preserved and most complete hands and feet of any T.Rex found as well as patches of original skin
  •     Fossil mummy of a Triceratops, with most of the skin still preserved intact
  •     A 12-foot wide, reconstructed jaw of a Megalodon, a marine monster that was the largest shark that ever lived —poised in the act of ambushing a swimming mastodon
  •     A 17-foot, fleshed-out model of a Dimetrodon presented alongside “Willie,” the most complete Dimetrodon ever found
  •     Hundreds of hands-on specimens that allow for visitors to feel the bite marks on ancient prey carcasses and figure out which jaws inflicted the damage
  •      A nesting site for a Quetzalcoatlus family, ancient pterosaurs with 30-foot wingspans and bigger than a modern jet fighter
  •     The “Left-Behind” Exhibit—one of the finest displays of petrified poop—proof positive of prehistoric diets
  •      Numerous fossils brought to life with art and animation
  •     One of the world’s most spectacular collections of gem-quality petrified wood—with some sections up to 8 ft. wide
  •      100+ exquisitely-preserved marine Trilobites
  •      And much more!

See Progress on the New Wing! Time Lapse Construction Video

“When Houstonians support the Museum as members, we want them to feel like they own the place,” said Latha Thomas, vice president of marketing and communications. “This world-class institution does not belong to the staff that works here, but to everyone in the Houston area and beyond. With the addition of the incredible new paleontology hall, HMNS strives to become even more fascinating and educational for our guests.”

Expansion Plan
In addition to a brand new Hall of Paleontology, the expansion plan will also create more than 115,000 square feet of badly needed exhibition, education, and classroom space - effectively doubling the number of classrooms currently available for educational programs; doubling the amount of public exhibition space that will be available for temporary and permanent installations; and tripling the amount of available collections storage space, to ensure the conservation and care of our collections for decades to come.

Get the latest: Blog Updates | Flickr Photos | Everything Expansion-Related—In One Place
Summer Member Events
Party with other members of the Houston Museum of Natural Science at exclusive free events all summer long:

Saturday, June 11; 6 – 9 p.m.
Prehistoric Monsters: Quetzalcoatlus
Be one of the first to see Quetzalcoatlus, one of the prehistoric monsters that will populate the Museum’s new paleontology hall when it opens Summer 2012. During this exclusive, Members-only free event, enjoy a kid-friendly lecture with paleontologist Dr. Bob Bakker and watch fossils for the new hall being prepared. Kids will love live animal demonstrations, dinosaur arts and crafts, and a photo-op with the Quetzalcoatlus.

Lectures to take place in the Burke Baker Planetarium at 6:30, 7:30, and 8:30 p.m. Seating is first come, first served.

Saturday, July 16; 6 – 9 p.m.
Prehistoric Monsters: Mosasaur
Be one of the first to see the enormous, ram-snouted mosasaur, Tylosaurus—one of the prehistoric sea monsters that will be featured in the Museum’s new paleontology hall when it opens Summer 2012. During this exclusive, Members-only free event, enjoy meeting paleontologist Dr. Bob Bakker, live animal demonstrations, dinosaur arts and crafts, and a photo-op with the mosasaur—one of the biggest creatures that roamed the earth’s oceans.

Lectures to take place in the Burke Baker Planetarium at 6:30, 7:30, and 8:30 p.m. Seating is first come, first served.

Sunday, July 24; 1 – 4 p.m.
Prehistoric Monsters: Sugar Land
Join the museum for dinosaur arts and crafts at the Houston Museum of Natural Science at Sugar Land—and a chance to meet real paleontologists. Along with light refreshments, learn about all the dinosaurs featured at the museum and watch up close as museum staff cleans a recently discovered Dimetrodon fossil, “Diego.”

This event takes place at the Houston Museum of Natural Science at Sugar Land.

Saturday, August 13; 6 – 9 p.m.
Prehistoric Monsters: Megalodon
To celebrate the popular annual “Shark Week” put on by the Discovery Channel, be one of the first to see Houston’s reconstructed jaw of the fearsome Megalodon, an ancient relative of modern day sharks— measuring over 30-ft. long, with a 12-ft. wide jaw—that will be displayed in the new paleontology hall when it opens Summer 2012.

During this exclusive, Members-only free event enjoy a kid-friendly lecture with paleontologist Dr. Bob Bakker and search for fossil sharks’ teeth as well as discover traces of life, including many species of shark. Kids will love getting their photo taken with this giant Megalodon jaw.

Lectures to take place in the Burke Baker Planetarium at 6:30, 7:30, and 8:30 p.m. Seating is first come, first served.

Help HMNS build it. For more information, visit the museum’s website at http://www.hmns.org.

The Houston Museum of Natural Science—one of the nation’s most-heavily attended museums—is a centerpiece of the Houston Museum District. With four floors of permanent exhibit halls, including the Wortham IMAX® Theatre, Cockrell Butterfly Center, Burke Baker Planetarium and George Observatory and as host to world-class and ever-changing touring exhibitions, the Houston Museum has something to delight every age group. With such diverse and extraordinary offerings, a trip to the Houston Museum of Natural Science, located at 5555 Hermann Park Drive in the heart of the Museum District, is always an adventure.

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