Do All Altar Boys Go To Heaven?

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New book gives sartorial outlook on Catholic Church from altar boy’s viewpoint

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“Growing up in an environment of fear, mystery and guilt, I wanted to provide readers with a humorous perspective on these difficult issues,” says May.

The Catholic Church seems to be under constant scrutiny lately and one former altar boy is speaking out about its practices, but with a sartorial outlook.

Thrust into the world of an altar boy at age six, placed into an all boys Catholic school at age 13, seduced by an adult woman at age 15 and experienced the segregated south at age 18, William May shares a quirky viewpoint of it all in his new book, Billy Boy.

“Growing up in an environment of fear, mystery and guilt, I wanted to provide readers with a humorous perspective on these difficult issues,” says May.

William May experienced an era in American history that not only shaped religious culture but also racial and familial culture. Billy Boy addresses these key issues based on his own experience with a humorous element, giving readers a glimpse into an unbelievable life.

“For anyone who grew up in a strict religious environment, was a victim of child molestation, or witnessed racial segregation, my book provides some level of comfort," says May. “I have a good understanding of these issues because I lived them.”

Billy Boy showcases that despite difficulties in one’s childhood people can fulfill their dreams.

For more information about the book please visit:http://www.billyboybook.com

Billy Boy
William May
ISBN 978-1-4567-2903-5
Paperback 6x9
Available at http://www.amazon.com and http://www.barnesandnoble.com

About the author
William May currently lives in New Ipswich, New Hampshire, with his wife, Jeanne. He grew up in a Catholic home in Townsend, Massachusetts, became an altar boy when he was six, and was enrolled in an all boys Catholic school at age 13. May lived for a year in Memphis, Tennessee when it was segregated and flew as a R4D-8 aircraft navigator in the US Navy in the early sixties. He became a National Certified Emergency Medical Technician in 1974, graduated from the Massachusetts Municipal State Police Academy in 1975, Mount Wachusett Community College in 1977, and from the Massachusetts State Police Crime Scene Search School in 1978. May became the Chief of Police for Townsend, Massachusetts, in 1981 and retired from the position in June 2002 after a thirty-year career. He is currently writing a second book detailing the humorous side of being a small town police officer. May also plays dobro, fiddle and accordion in a bluegrass/country band.

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Megan Giannini
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