Oakland Zoo Breaks Ground on New Veterinary Medical Hospital

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On Wednesday, July 13, 2011 at 10:30am, Dr. Joel Parrott, Executive Director of Oakland Zoo, and Dr. Karen Emanuelson, Oakland Zoo Director of Veterinary Services, will be surrounded by supporters of the Zoo, friends of the Zoo, volunteers, and staff as they break ground for the Zoo’s new 17,000 square-foot Veterinary Medical Hospital. The new hospital will become a model veterinary care center for best practices in animal care by incorporating green and sustainable construction.

“This is a long awaited event, and it is a huge leap forward for medical care of animals at the Oakland Zoo,” said Dr. Karen Emanuelson. “A great team of people have come together to build a world-class institution.”

On Wednesday, July 13, 2011 at 10:30am, Dr. Joel Parrott, Executive Director of Oakland Zoo, and Dr. Karen Emanuelson, Oakland Zoo Director of Veterinary Services, will be surrounded by supporters of the Zoo, friends of the Zoo, volunteers, and staff as they break ground for the Zoo’s new 17,000 square-foot Veterinary Medical Hospital. The new hospital will become a model veterinary care center for best practices in animal care by incorporating green and sustainable construction. “This is a long awaited event, and it is a huge leap forward for medical care of animals at the Oakland Zoo,” said Dr. Karen Emanuelson. “A great team of people have come together to build a world-class institution.”

The facility is designed to treat and accommodate a variety of animals and their specific needs – from sun and humidity-loving reptiles, to tiny birds, to cold-adapted grizzly bears. Animals ranging from a 2400 pound camel to a 5 gram frog will be treated in the Zoo’s new hospital. The immediate benefit to the healthcare of animals in the Zoo’s collection is only the beginning of the hospital’s applications. This building will be utilized in fulfilling the Oakland Zoo’s mission – educating veterinary students and animal health professionals and supporting scientists in their conservation endeavors – and will truly be a center for lifelong learning. “We look forward to providing care to free ranging wildlife like the California Condor,” said Dr. Karen Emanuelson. “We will be able to treat wild condors that have been subjected to lead poisoning.”

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Nicky Mora
Oakland Zoo
(510) 632-9525 130
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Nancy Filippi
Oakland Zoo
(510) 632-9525 132
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