Using Arduino to Build Basic and Advanced Robots

Apress’s latest book, "Arduino Robotics," takes the versatility and accessibility of the Arduino platform to provide readers with hands-on instruction in building both basic and advanced robots.

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Arduino Robotics

Arduino Robotics front cover

Using Arduino for robot building has become a very attractive option for electronics hobbyists.

New York, NY (PRWEB) July 20, 2011

Apress’s latest book, by John-David Warren, "Arduino Robotics," takes the versatility and accessibility of the Arduino platform to provide readers with hands-on instruction in building both basic and advanced robots. Using Arduino for robot building has become a very attractive option for electronics hobbyists because Arduino microcontrollers are inexpensive, Arduino software is open source (free to use and modify), Arduino is an easy-to-learn programming language derived from C++, and there is a strong, supportive online community of Arduino users.

With a basic Arduino microcontroller and some metal or wood, nuts, bolts, screws, glue, and tape, anyone can make a robot come to life. "Arduino Robotics" helps readers express their creativity in designing and building a wide range of robots—from simple line-following and bump-sensor bots to more complex robots that can battle or even mow the lawn.

About "Arduino Robotics"

"Arduino Robotics" shows readers how to use the Arduino platform to control a variety of different robots, providing step-by-step instructions on the entire robot-building process. This book teaches Arduino basics as well as the characteristics of the different types of motors used in robotics. "Arduino Robotics" starts with basic robots and moves on to more complex projects, including a GPS-enabled robot, a robotic lawn mower, a fighting bot, and even a DIY Segway-clone.

"Arduino Robotics"
By John-David Warren, Josh Adams, and Harald Molle
ISBN13: 978-1-4302-3183-7
628 Pages
Published July 18, 2011
Print Book Price: $39.99
eBook Price: $27.99
For more information, visit http://www.apress.com/9781430231837

About the Authors
John-David Warren is an electronics hobbyist, builder, and relentless tinkerer. He has built many different projects ranging from an electric fishing pole to a remote-controlled lawn mower, which was featured on the cover of MAKE magazine in April 2010. In addition to building robots and remote-controlled toys, he enjoys automating everyday tasks, designing and etching PCBs, and lots of random things in between. J-D graduated from the University of Alabama at Birmingham with a degree in business management.

Josh Adams is a software developer with more than ten years of professional experience building production-quality software and managing projects. He built a Tesla coil for a high-school science project that shot >27" bolts of lightning. Josh is Isotope Eleven’s lead architect and is responsible for overseeing architectural decisions and translating customer requirements into working software. Josh graduated from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) with degrees in both mathematics and philosophy.

Harald Molle has been a computer engineer since 1984. He started his career by becoming a researcher at a university in the southwest of Germany before cofounding an embedded systems company. Harald is an expert scuba diver, a passion he is trying to combine with his work by developing a GPS-controlled robot to survey lakes.

About Apress

Apress Media LLC, part of Springer Science+Business Media, is a technical publisher devoted to meeting the needs of IT professionals, software developers, and programmers, with more than 1,000 books in print and a continually expanding portfolio of publications. Apress provides high-quality, no-fluff content in print and electronic formats that help serious technology professionals build a comprehensive pathway to career success. For more information about Apress, visit http://www.apress.com.

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