Airline Miles Credit Cards Offering Bigger Benefits To Capture New Customers

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Similar to cash back cards, airline miles credit cards offer rewards to consumers whenever they use the card to make purchases.

These new incentives seem to being driving more and more consumers to sign up for airline credit cards.

Consumers stand to gain even more as airline miles credit card provider compete to earn customer loyalty. Similar to cash back credit cards, airline miles credit cards offer rewards to consumers whenever they use the card to make purchases. Instead of the cash back rewards they will accumulate miles that can be used to pay for flights and other travel related purchases like hotel reservations and car rentals. Initially these cards had been marketed mostly to frequent flyers but now the marketing has changed a lot to target even the Average Joe who could accumulate miles to pay, at least in part, for a special upcoming trip. Still many consumers were put off by the annual fees and high interest rates that come part and parcel with airline miles credit cards. The industry response has been to add a whole new set of extra perks to expand their customer base.

Thanks to all these new added incentives consumers can now pay less to travel via air in a world where airline fees continue to skyrocket. This is a welcome relief on consumer wallets for sure. As the airlines credit card providers and even the banks continue to compete in order to provide consumers with the best incentives thus winning them over to their programs the consumer only stands to gain.

Some of the more recent benefits include a first checked bag free for the card holder and up to 7 travelling companions as is the case for American Express SkyMiles Credit Cards. At a rate of $25 per checked bag that amounts to a savings of up to $350 for a travelling family or group on a round trip flight.

It gets even better since a few airline miles credit cards programs like Citibank American Airlines Credit Cards are providing as much as 30,000 to 50,000 miles as a sign up bonus to customers when they use the card the very first time. This gives the card holder enough points for one or two domestic flights. Some programs up the ante a bit by giving consumers as much as two to three points on all purchases and even more for those that are travel related. Add these cold hard savings to the elimination of blackout dates, expiration dates, reduction in annual fees or having them waived for the first year and you will understand why airline miles credit card programs are now capturing even more consumers.

According to Tim Bruno, founder of Airline Miles Credit Cards ( http://www.airlinemilescreditcards.net/ ) , “These new incentives seem to being driving more and more consumers to sign up for airline credit cards. Any smart consumer would be able to easily calculate the savings and the incentives that they will receive the moment that they sign on.” He offered one word of caution though, “These programs are very enticing but that does not mean that they are for everyone. Consumers sometimes get so caught up in the benefits that they overlook the high interest rates. The average rate of 13.83% on these reward cards can be 3-4% higher than non-reward cards. This is not good for people who cannot pay off their account balance every month.”

Airline Miles Credit Cards has been providing a place where consumers can compare airline credit cards since 2004. With 7 years in business they have seen the how much the industry has changed over the years. The upward trend in the site traffic only proves that the acceptance and popularity of Airline Credit Cards is experiencing a renewed growth.

Expect that things will only get better as these airline miles credit cards programs seek to attract more and more consumers and improve the loyalty of the ones that they already have. They will continue to provide a lot of incentives that consumers can really enjoy and in the end the smart consumer will have a lot to gain.

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Jeremy Biberdorf
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