Lawsuit Against L.A. Sheriff's Department Alleges Severe Beating of Men's Central Jail Inmate by Sheriff Deputies, Including by Alleged Members of 3000 Boys Sheriff Gang

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Six armed Sheriff Deputies are alleged to have beaten unarmed, compliant inmate Evans Tutt in retaliation for his complaints about jail conditions and as part of the Deputies' campaign to prevent inmates from speaking with the ACLU.

Lawyers Michael Seplow, Genie Harrison and John Raphling, hope that Mr. Tutt’s case will help expose and root out the Sheriff’s Department gang culture as alleged in the Complaint.

On July 25, 2011, Schonbrun DeSimone Seplow Harris Hoffman & Harrison, LLP, and the Law Offices of John Raphling filed a federal lawsuit alleging civil rights violations, assault, battery and other claims, arising out of the claimed severe beating of Evans Tutt by Sheriff Deputies. Evans Tutt v. County of Los Angeles, Sheriff Leroy Baca, et al., CV11-06126 (United States District Court, Central District).

The Complaint alleges that Mr. Tutt was an inmate in the Men’s Central Jail at the time he was beaten by six armed Sheriff Deputies, some of who are members of a Sheriff’s gang called the 3000 Boys. The 3000 Boys are alleged to be a group comprised of Deputies who work on the 3000 floor of the Men’s Central Jail and use gang signs, wear tattoos, have initiation and promotion rituals, and engage in other gang-based behavior. KTLA has produced an in-depth look at the gang culture within the Sheriff’s Department, which included an interview with Chief Baca, who appeared to admit knowing about the gangs of Deputies within his department.

There has been decades of litigation by the ACLU about conditions in the Men’s Central Jail, including based on a consent decree in Rutherford, et al. v. Peter Pitchess, et al., CV75-4111-WPG (United States District Court, Central District) issued by federal Judge William P. Gray, Jr., against the Sheriff’s Department. The ACLU and federal Judge Steven D. Pregerson now monitor and enforce the Department’s compliance with the Rutherford consent decree. In recent court filings (Rutherford, et al. v. Peter Pitchess, et al., CV75-4111-WPG (United States District Court, Central District)), the ACLU contends that Sheriff Deputies have been involved in a campaign to deter and intimidate inmates from speaking with the ACLU about jail conditions, and have been punishing those inmates who are believed to have spoken with the ACLU.

Mr. Tutt’s Complaint alleges that he had complained about conditions in the jail almost every day for a week prior to the beating, that he was unarmed at the time of the beating, did not attack the Sheriff Deputies and did not resist them. He claims he was severely beaten, including with flashlights, and was repeatedly tased by the Deputies in retaliation for his complaints about illegal conditions in the Men’s Central Jail. Mr. Tutt alleges that he spent eleven days in the hospital after the beating.

Mr. Tutt’s lawyers, Michael Seplow, Genie Harrison and John Raphling, hope that Mr. Tutt’s case will help expose and root out the Sheriff’s Department gang culture as alleged in the Complaint, the claimed violent and undeserved beatings inflicted by Deputies on inmates who have not broken the jail’s rules, and the alleged campaign by Sheriff Deputies to silence inmates who would otherwise speak with the ACLU about conditions within the jail.

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Genie Harrison
SDSHH
(626) 441-4129 310
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