Connecticut Women's Hall of Fame to Celebrate "Women of Influence: Creating Social Change"

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Connecticut Women's Hall of Fame prepares to induct Isabelle M. Kelley, principal author of the Food Stamp Act of 1964 and first director of the U.S. Food Stamp Program; The Honorable Denise L. Nappier, first woman in Connecticut and first African American woman in the nation to be elected State Treasurer and the first African American woman in Connecticut elected to statewide office; and The Honorable Patricia M. Wald, first female judge to sit on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, subsequently serving as its Chief Judge.

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During this time when our country needs strong public service leaders, what better roles models than three women who have transformed lives at home and abroad?

The Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame’s (CWHF) 18th Annual Induction Ceremony & Celebration will honor “Women of Influence: Creating Social Change.” On October 25, 2011, in an event made possible by The Hartford and other distinguished sponsors at the Connecticut Convention Center, Isabelle M. Kelley, principal author of the Food Stamp Act of 1964 and first director of the U.S. Food Stamp Program; The Honorable Denise L. Nappier, first woman in Connecticut and first African American woman in the nation to be elected State Treasurer and the first African American woman in Connecticut elected to statewide office; and The Honorable Patricia M. Wald, first female judge to sit on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, subsequently serving as its Chief Judge, will join the ranks of the CWHF’s nearly 100 Inductees.

The CWHF will premiere tribute films that showcase the Inductees’ accomplishments and were produced by five-time Emmy Award winning documentary filmmaker Karyl K. Evans.

“This year’s Inductees are agents of change who have had a direct impact on policy, legislation, and social services,” said Katherine Wiltshire, executive director of the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame. “During this time when our country needs strong public service leaders, what better role models than three women who have transformed lives at home and abroad?”

In addition to the Inductees, the CWHF honors this year’s “Notable Women of Influence,” a diverse group of outstanding women who have turned their passion into power and changed the very fabric of our society.

The Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame is an educational outreach organization whose mission is to honor publicly the achievement of Connecticut women, preserve their stories, educate the public and inspire the continued achievements of women and girls. Founded in 1994 in Hartford, Connecticut, the Hall fills the void that traditional curricula still fail to address and today stands as the state’s premier source for women’s history with 96 Inductees. These women’s lives and accomplishments are celebrated and documented through a wide spectrum of innovative statewide programs offered free of charge to Connecticut citizens. Historically, the CWHF web site has been an educational tool receiving more than 75,000 individual visits each year, attracting international, national and local researchers, teachers and students. In August 2011, the CWHF officially launched its new “Virtual Hall,” an expanded and interactive resource. To explore the exhibits and purchase event tickets, please visit http://www.cwhf.org.

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Laura Phillips Ward

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