Team Summits Mt. Kilimanjaro, Raising Over $64,500 for Hemophilia

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A team of climbers summited Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, raising over $64,500 for the international nonprofit Save One Life, which provides sponsorships for patients with hemophilia in developing countries. Thanks to the money raised, Save One Life can now broaden its programs in Africa.

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“The climb was challenging,” said Kelley, “but not as challenging as life with hemophilia in countries where there is limited or no treatment.

A team of climbers summited Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, raising over $64,500 for the international nonprofit Save One Life, which provides sponsorships for patients with hemophilia in developing countries. Thanks to the money raised, Save One Life can now broaden its programs in Africa.

Save One Life founder Laureen Kelley is the mother of a child with hemophilia, an inherited bleeding disorder. Kelley is president of LA Kelley Communications, Inc., creator and publisher of educational materials for hemophilia families. Kelley has been traveling to Africa since 1999 to start hemophilia programs, and is believed to be the first mother of a child with hemophilia to summit Mt. Kilimanjaro. Other team members included Eric Hill, president of BioRx, a company that distributes biological pharmaceuticals, including the blood-clotting medicine factor; BioRx employees Jeff Salantai, the second American with hemophilia to summit, and Julie Winton, RN, who has a son with von Willebrand disease, a related bleeding disorder. Another prominent team member was Neil Herson, president and founder of ASD Healthcare, a major distributor of biological products in the US. The rest of the team included Kara Ryan, a pre-med student at Notre Dame, and children of Kelley, Hill and Herson.

Africa’s highest mountain, Kilimanjaro tops out at 19,340 ft. The climb took six days to complete. Climbers passed through five ecological zones, starting with tropical weather, and then reaching -5 degrees ºF at the summit, where oxygen is only 50% that of sea level.

Funds raised from the climb will be used to support an outreach program in Zimbabwe; establish post-secondary scholarships in Kenya; and prepare Tanzania and Ghana to launch Save One Life sponsorships.

“The climb was challenging,” said Kelley, “but not as challenging as life with hemophilia in countries where there is limited or no treatment. This trip highlights the great needs of Africans with hemophilia, most of whom receive little or no hemophilia care. Blood clotting medicine used in developed countries rarely finds a market in African countries.” She explained, “We have another long journey of training leaders and lobbying governments, but in the short term, we can provide factor donations and funding to allow patients to live.”

Save One Life was founded in 2001 and provides financial sponsorships for over 800 people with hemophilia and related bleeding disorders in 11 countries.

For more information or to support Save One Life, contact Save One Life executive director Martha Hopewell, (978) 352-7652 or visit http://www.saveonelife.net.

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Laureen Kelley
LA Kelley Communications, Inc.
(978) 352-7657
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