9/11 Tribute Exhibit at Fort Worth Museum of Science and History

Share Article

World Trade Center's largest artifact in Texas, comprised of three steel columns weighing 6,500 pounds and is 36 feet high by 6 feet wide by 3 feet thick, to be centerpiece of exhibit.

9/11, 9/11 Tribute, World Trade Center, artifact, steel columns, Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, Fort Worth, Fort Worth, Texas, museum, science, history, exhibit

World Trade Center Beam to be centerpiece of Fort Worth Museum of Science and History's 9/11 Tribute exhibit opening September 11, 2011

“We are honored to provide the community with a tribute site that pays homage to 9/11, the people who perished, and the brave men and women who served as first responders on that tragic day.”

Fort Worth Museum of Science and History will host a 10th anniversary 9/11 tribute in a free community event and will open a new exhibit, titled 9/11 Tribute, featuring the largest artifact in Texas from the World Trade Center on Sunday, September 11, 2011, starting at 8:45 a.m.

The massive beam, officially known as WTC 1, Column 133, floors 100-103 NIST Steel # N-101, Impact Steel by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, is a full-façade panel that once supported the three floors (101-103) located two stories above the center of the impact zone of the North Tower. Comprised of three steel columns, three stories high, bolted together, the beam weighs approximately 6,500 pounds and measures 36 feet high by 6 feet wide by 3 feet thick. It is one of the few recovered pieces that the National Institute of Standards and Technology has been able to trace to its exact location within the tower.

This piece of history will be on view free of charge beginning Sunday, September 11, in the Museum's atrium until November 2011, and afterwards, when it will be installed permanently as an exhibit outside the Museum's main entrance.

“We are honored to provide the community with a tribute site that pays homage to 9/11, the people who perished, and the brave men and women who served as first responders on that tragic day,” said Museum President Van A. Romans. “As a history museum, ours is an appropriate venue for such an important American artifact, and we are proud to make it possible for our guests to have access to it.”

Participants in the tribute include U.S. Congresswoman Kay Granger; Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price; Tarrant County Judge B. Glen Whitley; Raymond G. Dickerson, president of the board of trustees of the Fort Worth Independent School District; Fort Worth Fire Chief Rudolph Jackson, Jr., Fort Worth Fire Department Chaplain Cameron Brown; Fort Worth Police Chief Jeffrey W. Halstead, and the Joint Color Guards of the Fort Worth Fire and Police Departments.

After the Color Guard posts the colors, guests will recite the Pledge of Allegiance and sing the National Anthem. A tolling of the bell in respect for fallen firefighters by Lt. Steve Creed of the Fort Worth Fire Department will be followed by a Moment of Silence. The tribute will conclude with the singing of “God Bless America.”

View video of the World Trade Center beam being delivered to the museum in February 2011.

About the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History
Established in 1941, the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, anchored by its rich collections, is an institution dedicated to lifelong learning. The museum engages children and adult visitors through creative, vibrant programs and exhibits interpreting science and the history of Texas and the Southwest. The new $80-million campus opened in November 2009 marking the culmination of an extensive multiyear fundraising campaign. The museum is open daily, except Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and select Mondays in September. For information, visit http://www.fortworthmuseum.org or call 817-255-9300.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print