Munich To Host First Ever Lean Kanban Central Europe Conference

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Conference is meeting of leaders, consultants, managers, coaches and technologists working in fields including Kanban, Agile Software Development, Operations Management and Improvement and Project Management.

Lean Kanban Central Europe Conference Agile

The First Lean Kanban Central Europe Conference will bring together leaders in the fields of Kanban, Lean Product Development, business strategy, organization, operations, services and management of r

There are so many advances in the field that it's important to create accessible events within Europe that bring together leaders and practitioners from across the continent and from overseas to share ideas and experience.

The First Lean Kanban Central Europe Conference will bring together leaders in the fields of Kanban, Lean Product Development, business strategy, organization, operations, services and management of risk to explore how these innovative ideas and approaches can be applied to knowledge worker industries such as software development. The Conference will be held in Munich, Germany 17-18 October.

This conference is a meeting of leaders, consultants, managers, coaches and technologists working in fields including Kanban, Agile Software Development, Operations Management and Improvement and Project Management.

"We're excited to kick off in the first Central Europe conference in Munich," said conference Co-Chair David J. Anderson, who is considered the father of software Kanban and is Vice President of the Lean Software and Systems Consortium. "There are so many advances in the field that it's important to create accessible events within Europe that bring together leaders and practitioners from across the continent and from overseas to share ideas and experience. We created this conference in response to a growing demand from organizations who have been adopting Lean & Kanban within their knowledge work businesses in recent years."

Companies using these Kanban techniques are achieving impressive benefits, including saving time and money in their operations, development and even human resources and marketing departments. German company Xing, a global business network, started using Kanban to visualize and manage their workflow. According to Director of Quality Assurance Andreas Wachowski, the company has seen significant increases in both productivity and quality. Xing is currently Europe's premier social networking site for business professionals who want to promote their careers.

The Lean Kanban Central Europe Conference will cover topics relevant to Kanban, including:

  • A real life case study of an Internet Video startup who used Agile and Kanban methods to deliver a set of ideas originated on the back of an envelope to a fully live .com in less than 6 months.
  • Beyond Kanban: a Lean Systems Aproach
  • Using Kanban to affect and embrace change from R&D to production

This year's keynote speakers will be David J. Anderson, Father of Kanban for Software Development: Monday at 13:45; Kent Beck, Creator of Extreme Programming: Monday at 17:30; John Seddon, Expert for Lean Service Organisations: Tuesday at 09:15 and Stephen Bungay, Specialist for Strategy, Organisation and Leadership: Tuesday 16:15.

The conference will also feature Kanban Experience Reports. Sharing experiences and listening to others is a great way for attendees to learn collaboratively. That´s why Lean Kanban Central Europe is emphasizing real user experience reports. The conference features an entire track of Kanban experience reports with 11 presentations from 7 different countries, including: 

  • Development Process @ Prezi
  • End-to-end Kanban - A practical report
  • Kanban and the Importance of Equanimity - Navigating politics and data aversion at the BBC
  • Software Kanban: chances and challenges with a large scale lean/agile process at SAP
  • Scaling Kanban - Deliver big projects with 10+ teams and still sleep well
  • Growing Pains and Remedies. Using Kanban to affect and embrace change from R&D to production
  • Igniting change in 20 teams within 6 months. An experience Report from Sandvik IT Services
  • Ericsson Finland Agile and Lean Transformation, Experiences and Learnings
  • A Fool with a Tool is still a Fool - Introducing Kanban, but do it right!
  • How Agile and Lean changed my Organization

It-agile, the company that pioneered Kanban in Germany, is organizing the event.

Additional Information Available on the Web

For more information on the conference, please visit the conference Web page at: http://www.lean-kanban-conference.de/

What is Kanban?

Kanban is a term originally found in lean manufacturing. It signals new production only when inventories are running low – a way to focus efforts on the work that is actually needed based on demand of the customers and capacity of the workers.

A new form of Kanban was introduced by David J. Anderson in 2004 while working at Microsoft. This type of Kanban is designed for knowledge work environments such as software development – where inefficiencies are even harder to pinpoint due to the absence of physical inventory and the constant variation in the work produced.

Kanban for Knowledge Work

In Kanban for knowledge work, development processes are streamlined by better coordination driven primarily by improved visibility and greater focus on the highest value work. Kanban systems recognize that excess handoffs, bottlenecks, unavailable resources, and high overhead can cause delays. Inefficient systems may cause missed deadlines and longer working hours, or even effort spent in the wrong areas. Kanban seeks to reduce delays and establish a steady and predictable flow of work.

Kanban starts with an analysis of existing work and workflow. The current system is modeled on a physical or electronic board. The capacity of the team and the organization is identified and the available work is “pulled” into development based on that capacity. Those capacity limits are known as “WIP Limits” (work in progress limits) and they are critical to keep the development flowing at a steady and measurable rate.

Every Kanban board is different because each Kanban system is developed to reflect the unique context of the organization. Changes are made gradually as the organization becomes attuned to the flow of the work and sees opportunities to improve. These small improvements bring about the rapid integration of policies and wider system coordination – so much so that Kanban is also associated with the organization maturity gains identified in CMMI appraisals.

Many people previously involved in Agile systems such as Scrum or Extreme Programming are now looking into Kanban as a way to improve throughput and manage work in a continuous flow while still observing some of the Agile practices such as cross functional teams and daily communication.

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