Digital Technology Makes Cheating Easier for Students According to New Schools.com Series

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Using information from “Beat the Cheat,” a June article from Monitor on Psychology, Schools.com has created a new infographic that takes a look at the attitudes of students when it comes to cheating and just how much easier it is for students of all ages to cheat and plagiarize on assignments based on emerging technologies.

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The most alarming take away from the infographic is the correlation between cheating in college and cheating in the real world, like lying to customers, faulty insurance and tax claims, and adultery.

Schools.com, a definitive digital resource for education, announced the launch of its most recent content series today, which shows that as technology continues to evolve, cheating on tests and assignments has increased. Included in the new series is, “Cheater, Cheater!” an infographic that reveals one in three students have admitted to using the Internet to plagiarize a school assignment. Even more surprising, only 29 percent of people believe copying from the web is serious cheating.

“As technology continues to advance, students are being exposed to myriad of different cheating options,” said Seth Restaino, Schools.com spokesperson. “What’s worse is that with so many different ways to cheat, the lines between what is considered cheating and what is classified as research are becoming less clear for students. Hopefully this infographic will help to shed some light on the difference between the two.”

The infographic also shows that people who cheat in high school and college are more likely to cheat in life. An overwhelming 82 percent of college alumni admitted to cheating in some form as an undergraduate, which makes them two times more likely to lie or deceive their boss once they enter their professional career.

“The most alarming take away from the infographic is the correlation between cheating in college and cheating in the real world, like lying to customers, faulty insurance and tax claims, and adultery,” said Restaino.

To find more information on this and other education news, follow @schoolsedu on Twitter and Facebook.

About Schools.com
Schools.com is a definitive source for education, connecting students and prospective students with the right information, people and schools to help them advance in life. Featuring in-depth sections with faculty interviews, campus tours and national education news, the site aims to be a hub for higher education topics and trends. Schools.com is owned and operated by QuinStreet, Inc. (NASDAQ: QNST), one of the largest Internet marketing and media companies in the world. QuinStreet is committed to providing consumers and businesses with the information they need to research, find and select the products, services and brands that meet their needs. The company is a leader in visitor-friendly marketing practices. For more information, please visit QuinStreet.com.

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Sara Robbins
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