Alexandre Hogue Retrospective Opens at Fort Worth Museum of Science and History

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Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary – Paintings and Works on Paper at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History provides last opportunity to see this retrospective of the American artist who consistently captured the look and feel, as well as the psychological character of the land.

Alexander Hogue, Irrigation-Taos 1931, Art Museum of South Texas

"The most important aspect of this retrospective is that these works will never come together again in our lifetime."

Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary – Paintings and Works on Paper opens Saturday, Sept. 24, and runs through Sunday, Nov. 27, 2011, at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. The retrospective of the art of Alexandre Hogue (1898-1994), 157 oil paintings, drawings, and field sketches ― primarily Southwest landscapes ― represents a vital link in Texas art history. Of all the artists who came to maturity during the 1930s and 40s, Hogue is the preeminent figure who consistently captured the look and feel, as well as the psychological character of the land. Fort Worth is the third and final stop on the exhibition’s limited-engagement tour.

In collaboration with the museum, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art is exhibiting one of Hogue’s major oil paintings, Drouth Stricken Area (1934), and two related drawings, on loan from the Dallas Museum of Art.

“It is impossible to think of the art of the Southwest during the past century without including Alexandre Hogue in the picture,” said Susie Kalil, the curator of the exhibition. “No other Texas artist has accomplished the breadth of his work. The Houston-based art critic and independent curator interviewed the artist over an eight-year period and published an important critical work on Hogue to coincide with the exhibition named after her book.

"The most important aspect of this retrospective is that these works will never come together again in our lifetime," said Kalil.

Many of Hogue's works have never been shown before, and a retrospective of his works to this extent has never been attempted. This exhibition marks the first time for his final Big Bend series to be seen in its entirety. It is also the first time that the collection of his daughter, Olivia Hogue Mariño, has been shown in its entirety. Hogue's works in the exhibition are on loan from private collectors and art museums, including Amalia Mariño, granddaughter of Alexandre Hogue; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; the Centre Pompidou, National Museum of Modern Art/Design Center, Paris; the Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa; the Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the Dallas Museum of Art.

Organized by the Art Museum of South Texas in Corpus Christi, the exhibition debuted there in January 2011 before traveling to The Grace Museum in Abilene, Texas, with the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History as its final destination.

“We are honored to be one of only three institutions to host this exhibition featuring the works of a true visionary with ties to this region,” said Van A. Romans, president of the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. “His artistic insight and representation of Southwestern landscapes gives us a unique tool to advance our mission to interpret science and the stories of Texas and the Southwest."

About Alexandre Hogue    
Beginning his career in Texas in the 1920s, Alexandre Hogue inherited the view of an America that saw itself as filled with limitless potential. The Southwest – Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma – provided settings that allowed the artist to immerse himself in the wonder of the earth as he explored the subject matter of place. Hogue painted during and after the Great Depression, which greatly affected his works. He was not employed by the WPA or Federal Art Administration, unlike many other artists of the time. Also, unlike other artists during the Great Depression, Hogue chose to address man-made causes for the destruction of the land. In the early decades of the 20th century, before the term “conservation” became well known, Hogue worried that man’s impact on the planet could bring about intense storms or catastrophic drought. His paintings were often far ahead of their time, but throughout his life, Hogue remained outside the mainstream of American art.

Although self-taught, Hogue was named head of the art department at the University of Tulsa in 1945, a position he held until 1963.

About the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History
Established in 1941, the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, anchored by its rich collections, is an institution dedicated to lifelong learning. The museum engages children and adult visitors through creative, vibrant programs and exhibits interpreting science and the history of Texas and the Southwest. The new $80-million campus opened in November 2009 marking the culmination of an extensive multiyear fundraising campaign. The museum is open daily, except Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and select Mondays during the school year. For information, visit http://www.fortworthmuseum.org or call 817-255-9300.

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