Study Shows Moms Are Concerned About Having Enough Money Each Week to Feed Their Families

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According to a recent consumer perception study conducted by leading market research firm ClickIQ, cash strapped consumers are turning to creative measures in order to feed their families with their limited budgets.

48% of all respondents identified themselves as “extremely” or “very” concerned about having enough money at the end of the month to feed their families

In a recent consumer perception study, ClickIQ surveyed moms with school aged children regarding their food purchases in the present economy. 42% of respondents indicated that they have less than $100 per week to spend on food for their families. Of this group, 22% indicated they have five or more people living in their household.

48% of all respondents identified themselves as “extremely” or “very” concerned about having enough money at the end of the month to feed their families. Only 9% indicated they were “not at all” concerned.

When asked if they have tried “creative” solutions to help stretch their food budget, 36% of respondents indicated that they have, with the most common responses related to reducing the amount of meat called for in a dish, extreme couponing, and adding bread or water as fillers to many food or beverage items.

While considering their monthly budgets, respondents were asked if they need to eliminate other purchases in order to purchase more healthy foods; 60% indicated that they do. Based on the open-ended responses, snack foods and entertainment were eliminated most often.

With limited food budgets and healthy eating concerns, respondents were asked about their vitamin usage. 57% of responding adults reported that they take a daily vitamin. Of these, 67% said they take a daily vitamin because they cannot eat healthy enough or that it seems like a healthy choice. 46% of all respondents reported that they give all of their children a daily vitamin with an additional 10% indicating that they give at least some of their children a daily vitamin.
Methodology

Data was collected in an online survey with 400 of ClickIQ’s US consumer panel from August 26, 2011 through August 29, 2011. Target respondents were moms who have school age children under the age of 18 living in the household. The survey results have margin of error of +/-5% at a 95% confidence level.

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Robert Boese
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