Aseptipak 2011: Pasteurized Orange Juice With Fresh-Squeezed Taste

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Pasteurization damages orange juice's flavor and aroma, and reduces its nutritional value. Attempting to compensate for this, juice companies add back "flavor packs." Industry experts claim the resulting product does not taste like fresh-squeezed. Raztek Corporation's proprietary second generation electroheating technology retains orange juice's fresh-squeezed taste by passing electric current through concentrate, heating in a fraction of a second, followed by rapid cooling. Microorganisms are killed and enzymes are deactivated. The process ensures a high quality, stable product without heat damage. This technology and supporting research will be presented at the Aseptipak 2011 Global Forum on Aseptic Processing, Filling & Packaging, Nov. 2-3, Chicago.

Aseptipak 2011 Global Forum

Raztek's 2nd generation electroheating technology kills microorganisms while preserving fresh-squeezed taste.

Attempting to replicate the fresh-squeezed flavor and taste in pasteurized orange juice is extremely difficult. Pasteurization's high heat processing not only kills food-borne pathogens, it also destroys flavor and aroma compounds and nutrients like vitamin C. Attempting to compensate for this, juice companies add back "flavor packs", according to a recent publication by Dr. Alissa Hamilton of the University of Toronto. Even so, some industry experts like Hamilton maintain that the resulting pasteurized product does not taste like fresh-squeezed juice.

California-based Raztek Corporation believes that its second generation electroheating technology does yield fresh-squeezed taste. In the proprietary process, an electric current is passed through flowing orange juice concentrate, thereby raising its temperature to 105 degrees C in a fraction of a second. After a half-second hold time, the product is rapidly cooled by mixing it with sterile cold water to reconstitute the juice. This thermal history not only ensures killing microorganisms, but also deactivates all enzymes. It also ensures a high quality, stable product without heat damage, according to Raztek.

The company says that there are a dozen such systems now in operation, each typically processing 14,000 liters/hour of fruit juices.

This technology and supporting research results will be discussed in an exclusive presentation by Raztek's president, David Reznik, at the ASEPTIPAK 2011 Global Forum on Aseptic Processing, Filling & Packaging. It will take place on November 2-3 at the Hilton Rosemont Chicago O'Hare Hotel, in Chicago, USA.

ASEPTIPAK is the world's only major forum exclusively devoted to aseptic and ESL technology and market developments. View program highlights and register for this unique event at http://aseptipakglobalforum.com

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Ron Schotland
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