Mesothelioma Law Firm Now Offers Vital Facts Regarding Asbestos in the Home

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Clapper Patti Schweizer & Mason, mesothelioma attorneys who have been representing clients in asbestos lawsuits for more than 30 years, now offer up-to-date information regarding where asbestos in the home is likely to be located, how risk of exposure occurs, and what to do if you suspect your home contains asbestos materials.

Areas in the Home Where Asbestos Likely Lurks

Clapper Patti Schweizer & Mason (CPSM) are expert mesothelioma attorneys who have been specializing in asbestos litigation for over thirty years. Their experience is reflected in the depth of their knowledge about the hundreds of thousands of asbestos containing products that exist in homes today. These materials continue to pose a potential threat to homeowners, electricians, plumbers, carpenters and construction workers of exposure that could, decades later, cause serious illnesses such as mesothelioma, asbestosis and other forms of asbestos cancer.

Although government and environmental agencies began enforcing restrictions and bans on the use of asbestos in the late 1970’s, the rate of diagnosis for mesothelioma for home and professional renovators and anyone involved in the construction industry is expected to be one of the highest. This is because many of the older buildings undergoing repair, renovation or demolition were constructed using asbestos materials.

Most homes built before the 1980’s contain asbestos insulation and thermal coverings around hot water heaters and pipes, fireplaces, and stoves. Asbestos is also found in the electrical system around wires and fuse box linings. Other common places to find asbestos is in floor and ceiling tiles, roofing materials, chimney flues, paints, sealants, millboard and wallboard. Beyond these more common construction products, the new section on the CPSM website goes even further to list some common household items once constructed with asbestos, such as hairdryers and ironing board covers.

To help homeowners, builders, carpenters, plumbers, electricians and construction workers, CPSM now has a whole section of their website offering vital facts about these and other asbestos products. One part of new section is devoted solely to asbestos materials likely to be found in any home or building constructed before 1980. CPSM also provides a comprehensive list of home asbestos products as well as current regulations and safe asbestos handling practices recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for homeowners and OSHA for employers and workers.

Asbestos materials in older homes are more likely to be in a deteriorated condition, posing an even greater risk of exposure. If you are a homeowner or builder about to start renovations, remodeling, repair or demolishing of an older building, hiring asbestos abatement specialists is highly recommended. Abatement professionals are specifically trained to identify and safely remove asbestos using a variety of techniques, protective clothing, and respirators that prevent any asbestos from becoming airborne and inhaled or ingested. The only time the EPA recommends leaving asbestos alone is if the product is intact and in good condition or fully encapsulated.    

For more detailed information about products likely to contain asbestos in the home as well as safe handling and removal practices of contaminated materials, visit the new section on the CPSM website Household Products Containing Asbestos.

About Clapper Patti Schweizer & Mason
CPSM are expert attorneys with the most extensive experience in product identification and successful asbestos lawsuit litigation. If you are a homeowner or work in the construction industry and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, you have a right to file an asbestos lawsuit and/or bankruptcy claim against the manufacturers of the products responsible for your illness. Contact us today for help investigating the source of your prior asbestos exposure and for a free case evaluation.

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Sally Clapper