Economic Modeling Firm Tracks Jobs, Skills

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Do you know what the fastest growing jobs will be over the next two years? EMSI does. Predicting future growth and analyzing trends is the cornerstone of the Moscow firm and this type of data is in demand.

There are 13 million people unemployed in the U.S. and 4 million job openings. There’s a skill gap in this country – companies are finding it difficult to find the right person for the job.

Do you know what the fastest growing jobs will be over the next two years? EMSI does.

Predicting future growth and analyzing trends is the cornerstone of the Moscow firm and this type of data is in demand. EMSI has been on the Inc. 500 or Inc. 5000 list five years in a row, making it one of the fastest growing companies in the country.

Economic Modeling Specialists Inc., or EMSI, is taking its expertise and expanding it into the jobs market. The company is working in partnership with a private firm to develop a new workforce tool. The web-based tool will enable users, primarily Fortune 500 companies, to see – down to the zip-code level – what types of positions are available across the country and what types of training and educational programs are available in that area.

“There are 13 million people unemployed in the U.S. and 4 million job openings. There’s a skill gap in this country – companies are finding it difficult to find the right person for the job,” said Andrew Crapuchettes, EMSI’s CEO. “It’s to the point where GE recently hired a chief talent acquisition officer.”

This new tool is an expansion of EMSI’s traditional products that have focused mainly on educational institutions as its customer base.

EMSI primarily does economic impact studies for higher education organizations and has done more than 1,000 studies for community colleges and universities in the United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. The market for these studies has expanded to workforce investment boards.”

“We started with community colleges because they needed to talk about return-on-investment,” said Crapuchettes. “Human capital is a unique investment. When you invest in human capital, it increases in value. When people earn more, they are able to pay more in taxes and they are less of a burden on a community. Statistically, we can show these correlations.”

EMSI’s data can also tell colleges what the next high-wage jobs will be that they need to train for.

“We have a series of web-based tools that help give them a better understanding of what they need to do to keep up with the economy,” he said. “A new nursing program is a more than $4 million decision so they need to put more thought into it. We give them information so they can make the right decision.”

EMSI was founded in Moscow by Kjell Christophersen and Hank Robison, who both taught at University of Idaho, and serve as senior economists for EMSI.

Crapuchettes, a former dot-commer from the San Francisco Bay area, moved to Moscow to enjoy a better quality of life. He said EMSI has been able to attract a high level of talent to the area by those seeking a similar lifestyle for their families.

“We have hard-working people here with strong ethical values,” he said. “It’s factored into our growth.”

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Joshua Wright
EMSI
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