IMA Identifies Areas of Risk for Leaders of Transformational Change in Free eBook

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Transformational change is one of the most misunderstood, abused terms used in the business world today, and is being touted by leaders without a full understanding of what is really implied. The eBook highlights ten common activities that leaders of transformational change invest in, but are actually pitfalls that don’t lead to value realization for the transformation.

Don Harrison, President and Founder of IMA is the developer of the Accelerating Implementation Methodology (AIM.)

Don Harrison, President and Founder, IMA

This is the paradox of transformational change: the people you actually seek to sponsor the transformation also have the most resistance.

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IMA (Implementation Management Associates, Inc.) announces the availability of a complimentary eBook, “Get Real About Transformational Change: What Works. What Doesn’t.”

The eBook highlights ten common activities that leaders of transformational change invest in, but are actually pitfalls that don’t lead to value realization. This top ten, “get real” list is based on thirty years of field research in the trenches of global industry leaders.

Transformational change is one of the most misunderstood, abused terms used in the business world today, and is being touted by leaders without a full understanding of what is really implied. “If you talk ‘transformation’ you can’t just deliver better, faster, cheaper,” says Don Harrison, IMA President. “If you are promising transformation, understand that you are talking about radical and complex change of the very fabric of the organization.”

The intent of the eBook is to inform leaders of potential areas of risk to be avoided, as well as highlighting four fundamental “must-have’s” for successful transformational change. Perhaps the most common pitfall is the practice of re-drawing the organization chart and shuffling executives around the boxes. As Harrison says, “Many senior executives believe that changing the players is the sole solution, but you can’t implement structural solutions to what are inherently cultural issues. This is akin to shuffling the deck chairs on the Titanic.”

Harrison notes that leaders are also seduced by the level of activity going on in the organization rather than focusing on what will actually drive the change, which ironically is their own behavior as sponsors. Sponsorship must be built, management-level-by management-level so that every manager is consistently expressing, modeling and reinforcing their personal commitment by their daily actions with their direct reports.

As Harrison suggests, this is the paradox of transformational change: the people you actually seek to sponsor the transformation also have the most resistance because you are asking them to fly in the face of their previous success and the current culture. Organizations should anticipate far more resistance from mid-managers through executive ranks than lower down in the organization.

The eBook points out that organizations must define the transformation in terms of the new behaviors, and sponsors must be willing to visibly demonstrate that they are personally paying a price. Says Harrison, “There must be some overt and demonstrable change in sponsor behavior that signifies a sacrifice on the part of that sponsor. Otherwise it appears that this is for everyone ‘out there’ and not for the people who live in ‘mahogany row.’”

Implementation Management Associates (IMA) is an international consulting practice that guides organizations through all types of organizational change implementations, applying a business-disciplined, structured approach to implementation management known as AIM (Accelerating Implementation Methodology.)

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