OceanWorks Takes Lead In the Expansion of the VENUS Seafloor Network Project

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Due to the success of the VENUS Coastal Network, originally built and deployed in 2006 and 2007, VENUS at Ocean Networks Canada with the support of the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s Leading Edge Fund has entered into a contract with OceanWorks International to effectively double the capacity of the seafloor network operating in the Strait of Georgia and in Saanich Inlet.

OceanWorks' experience and leadership in the expansion of the VENUS system means that Canadian and international researchers will be able to collect greater and more varied data from Saanich Inlet and the Strait of Georgia.

Due to the success of the VENUS Coastal Network, originally built and deployed in 2006 and 2007, VENUS at Ocean Networks Canada with the support of the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s Leading Edge Fund has entered into a contract with OceanWorks International to effectively double the capacity of the seafloor network operating in the Strait of Georgia and in Saanich Inlet.

The existing nodes, designed and built by OceanWorks, allowed for the connection of four (4) Subsea Instrument Interface Modules (SIIMs) and a maximum of 24 individual instrument ports per node. Based on the success of this novel system and the demand by scientists, all three (3) existing VENUS nodes were upgraded to add an additional four (4) wet-mate connectors, doubling the capacity of the system. As well, an additional eight (8) SIIMS for the Saanich Inlet and Strait of Georgia arrays of VENUS were delivered to support up to forty-eight (48) additional instrument ports on the array.

This upgrade also allows VENUS an opportunity to evaluate the long term effects of the system that has been operating continuously since February of 2006 and to validate the novel design elements for long-submergence cabled observatories.

“OceanWorks' experience and leadership in the expansion of the VENUS system means that Canadian and international researchers will be able to collect greater and more varied data from Saanich Inlet and the Strait of Georgia. VENUS will now be capable of supporting new methodologies in the study of critical ocean phenomena.” says Adrian Round, VENUS Associate Director of Engineering and Operations at the University of Victoria.

“’OceanWorks is pleased to once again be teaming with the University of Victoria and the VENUS observatory team to expand the capabilities of this system and to be able to apply some of the advances we have made in the preceding 6 years to ensure that VENUS remains on the cutting edge of Cabled Observatory system technology and reliability” says Rod Stanley, Chief Executive Officer at OceanWorks.

OceanWorks is an internationally recognized subsea technology company specializing in the design and manufacture of manned / unmanned subsea systems and specialized equipment for military, oil and gas, scientific, and other marine markets. Offering a full range of subsea system engineering, design and analysis, fabrication, testing, and project management services, OceanWorks has been at the cutting edge of deep submergence and diving technology, operations, and support for over 20 years.

For more information on OceanWorks products and services please visit our website at http://www.oceanworks.com. For more information on the VENUS Observatory science, including real time data from Saanich Inlet and the Strait of Georgia please visit http://www.venus.uvic.ca.

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Andra Nedelcu
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