7 Ways College Students Can Kill Any Chance of Getting a Job

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Social media background checks dig dirt on college students and sell it to employers and recruiters, says "Privacy Mom" and founder of Collegiate Nation- GoCNCN.com, the first and only private network dedicated to protecting the privacy of college students.

privacy is important

Privacy is not a luxury

It's legal for companies to collect dirt on college student, then sell it to an employer or recruiter. That's the nightmare scenario looming.

There are 7 sure ways that college students can sabotage their chances of getting that dream job. Collegiate Nation- GoCNCN.com has compiled this list to raise awareness on campuses. Social media background checks are in vogue. They will increase in 2012 and beyond. Students need to know the threat to their future is real.

1. Post on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ photos of yourself surrounded by beer and liquor bottles. Piles of weed, pills and white powder works too.

2. Use as many unprintable four letter words as you can.

3. Expose parts of your body that no one wants to see.

4. Post racist comments, promote sexist acts, and make fun of anyone that's different.

5. Brag about taking photos of exams with your smart phone. Offer to sell the exams.

6. Make sure you have many online friends that talk about their boss.

7. Don't forget to use plenty of apps and games, or hang with people who do.

Most college students probably don't know that at least 79% of U.S. hiring managers and recruiters have reviewed online information about job applicants, and 69% of HR professionals have rejected applicants after reviewing information posted on social media.

"It's perfectly legal for companies to collect dirt on college student, then sell it to an employer or recruiter. They can legally keep the information. So that dooms many college students," says Evelyn Castillo-Bach who is an outspoken privacy advocate and the founder of Collegiate Nation, the first and only private network exclusively for college students, dedicated to protecting student privacy online by banning ads, apps, games and other tools used by data collectors.

As part of its 2012 Privacy Made Simple campaign, Collegiate Nation - GoCNCN.com wants every college student to know that the threat is real. "Do the math. Most college students will have a thick file by the time they graduate, a file they may know nothing about but it's out there and being shared. That's the nightmare scenario looming," says Castillo-Bach also known as "Privacy Mom" because she was inspired to create Collegiate Nation - GoCNCN.com when she saw how her sons used Facebook with their college friends.

Company Information:
Collegiate Nation -- also known as GoCNCN.com-- is the first and only private network completely dedicated to protecting the privacy of college students. It launched in late 2009 and was reviewed by Read Write Web and the New York Times in 2010. In late 2011, the site was totally redesigned to meet the demands of its student members who wanted more features. Today, the site is open to all college students with an edu address. It is used in 30 campuses throughout the United States. Collegiate Nation is known for fiercely protecting the privacy rights of college students. It has banned ads, all third party apps and games because they are back doors to extracting private information. The founder of Collegiate Nation is Evelyn Castillo-Bach. She earned her M.S. in 1993 from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She has traveled extensively in Ethiopia and in the Balkans, accompanying her Danish husband who is a lawyer.

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Jennifer Wright
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