Absolute Rights Newsletter “Crisis Ops” Column Reveals Exactly How To Troubleshoot A Semi Auto Handgun

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The “Crisis Ops” column in the Absolute Rights Newsletter outlines the most likely malfunctions which can occur while using a semi-automatic handgun.

Troubleshoot a Semi Automatic Handgun AbsoluteRights.com

Troubleshoot a Semi Automatic Handgun AbsoluteRights.com

How to troubleshoot a semi automatic handgun, will aid on the path to becoming a safer and more responsible firearm user.

The Absolute Rights newsletter is providing these suggestions on how to troubleshoot a semi automatic handgun, and will aid on the path to becoming a safer and more responsible firearm user.

The Absolute Rights newsletter “Crisis Ops” column says the first thing to do is to identify the malfunction. Misfeeds are a relatively likely occurrence, explains The “Crisis Ops” column, and this happens when a round is not loaded into the chamber. Next the “Crisis Ops” column says to make sure the malfunction is not a squib load, which is a relatively dangerous malfunction, where there is not enough force to propel the bullet out of the barrel. The “Crisis Ops” column says, a squib is often easily noticeable, because in a semi automatic pistol the slide will not cycle and a new round will not be chambered. The “Crisis Ops” column says, if a squib load does happen, remove the magazine and clear the obstruction immediately.

The Absolute Rights newsletter “Crisis Ops” column says, the next thing to do is to make sure the malfunction is not a hangfire, which is when the burning of the cartridge's propellant is delayed. The “Crisis Ops” column says, the only reason to try and immediately clear the malfunction is if there is live-fire going on, during a real confrontation, to lower the risk of the round eventually firing. The “Crisis Ops” column says, if there is a hangfire, keep the firearm pointed downward for at least 10 seconds before attempting to clear.

The Absolute Rights newsletter “Crisis Ops” column advises to correct the malfunction through immediate action, by pulling the slide back, then ejecting the last round. Closely observe the ejection and the round, says the “Crisis Ops” column, because if there is still lead on the bullet, the round didn't fire. If the lead is gone, says the “Crisis Ops” column, it may indicate a weapon malfunction, so observe the chamber, and check for double feeds, or things that don't belong. Then release the slide, seating the next round, the “Crisis Ops” column says, deactivate the safety and attempt to fire the weapon. If it still fails to fire, the “Crisis Ops” column advises, remove the magazine and eject the current round, then turn the weapon over to a gun expert for repair.

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