Part 3: New Jersey Auto Accident Lawyers at Console & Hollawell Remind All Teens to Buckle Up in Recognition of National Teen Driver Safety Week

In part three of the National Teen Driver Safety Week series, the Galloway car accident lawyers at Console & Hollawell want to remind all teen drivers in New Jersey and throughout the country that seatbelt usage greatly reduces the risk of being injured or killed in an accident.

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Buckling up every time you are in a car, whether as a driver or a passenger, is imperative to remaining safe should you be involved in an accident.

Marlton, New Jersey (PRWEB) October 17, 2012

In part three of the National Teen Driver Safety Week series, the Galloway car accident lawyers at Console & Hollawell want to remind all teen drivers in New Jersey and throughout the country that seatbelt usage greatly reduces the risk of being injured or killed in an accident. National Teen Driver Safety Week is a national observance that was first endorsed by Congress in 2007; it occurs the third week of October each year and is a reminder for all teenaged drivers to stay safe when behind the wheel, according to Teen Driver Source.*

Seatbelts have been proven time after time to be one of the best ways to prevent injury or death when a motor vehicle accident occurs. Out of all age groups, teen drivers are the least compliant when it comes to buckling up. In fact, 56 percent of drivers aged 16 to 20 years who were involved in fatal accidents in 2009 were not wearing their seatbelt, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. **

The National Teen Driver Safety Week website, Teen Driver Source, explained that in states where seatbelt usage is a secondary offense (meaning you cannot be pulled over just for not wearing your seatbelt) teens were much less likely to comply with seatbelt laws.*** Also, the most common reasons teens give for not wearing their seatbelt are:

  •     They were not traveling far.
  •     Seatbelts are uncomfortable.
  •     Seatbelts are not cool.
  •     They forgot.***

Atlantic County auto accident lawyer, Richard P. Console, Jr. explained that, “buckling up every time you are in a car, whether as a driver or a passenger, is imperative to remaining safe should you be involved in an accident.”

Console believes the most effective ways to increase seatbelt usage in teens could be to have stricter guidelines in all states regarding seatbelts. Research shows that teen drivers who live in states where not wearing a seatbelt is a primary offense (where a driver can be pulled over without having committed another traffic violation) were 12 percent more likely to buckled up compared with states where it is a secondary offense, according to Teen Driver Source.*** Console suggests that if individual state governments take a stronger stance with regards to wearing a seatbelt, by making it a primary offense with steep penalties, they could see a real, positive impact on teen drivers.

“Each state has its own set of guidelines with regards to what they feel is the best seatbelt law for their citizens,” Console said. “Would stricter enforcement reduce fatalities in their state? Most likely, but every state will need to come to this decision on their own.”

The Galloway accident attorneys at Console & Hollawell want all parents and teens to remember to buckle up, not just this week but every time they enter a vehicle. Whether you are travelling hundreds of miles or just a few blocks, wear a seatbelt every time. The fourth installment on teen drivers and speeding will be available tomorrow, October 18.

** http://www.nhtsa.gov/Driving+Safety/Driver+Education/Teen+Drivers/Teen+Drivers+-+Seat+Belt+Use
*** http://www.teendriversource.org/stats/researcher/detail/59