Part 4: New Jersey Car Accident Attorneys at Console & Hollawell Warn Teens of the Hazards of Speeding in Recognition of National Teen Driver Safety Week

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The fourth installment of the National Teen Driver Safety Week series presented by the Hudson County car accident lawyers at Console & Hollawell aims to educate teenagers on the dangers of speeding.

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Speed limits are not just arbitrary numbers, but rather speeds which have been set that are appropriate for that particular road so that motorists can safety arrive at their destination.

The fourth installment of the National Teen Driver Safety Week series presented by the Hudson County car accident lawyers at Console & Hollawell aims to educate teenagers on the dangers of speeding. Established in 2007, National Teen Driver Safety Week is observed the third week each October in order to bring attention to problems and ways to overcome risks involved with teen drivers, according to Teen Driver Source.*

It has been reported that 21 percent of all crashes that were contributed to “critical teen driver error,” were due to speeds that were not appropriate for the road conditions, according to Teen Driver Source, the official website for National Teen Driver Safety Week.** They also reported that male teens were more likely than female teens to speed, citing that 37 percent of males between the ages of 15 and 20 involved in fatal accidents in 2008 were speeding at the time of the crash.**

Richard P. Console Jr., a Bayonne car accident attorney, expressed, “no drivers, regardless of age, can be in so much of a rush that they need to negligently put their lives, and those of the other motorists they share the road with, in danger. Speed limits are not just arbitrary numbers, but rather speeds which have been set that are appropriate for that particular road so that motorists can safety arrive at their destination.”

Each state is responsible for setting their own speed limit and will vary depending on the classification of the road (local, highway, interstate, etc.). For example, in New Jersey, the state website explains that the general break-downs of speed are (unless otherwise posted):***

  •     25 mph in school zones, business, or residential areas
  •     35 mph in certain, less-dense business and residential areas
  •     50 mph on all other roadways (county routes, etc.)
  •     55 mph on certain state highways and all interstates
  •     65 mph on certain state highways

There is no road that has a speed limit higher than 65 in New Jersey, but the maximum speed limit will vary by state and areas within that state.***

Speeding can carry very significant penalties. In New Jersey even going between one and nine miles per hour over the speed limit can carry a fine of up to $85, according to the New Jersey Judiciary.**** Also travelling between one and nine miles over the speed limit in a construction zone could carry a fine of $140.****

Console believes that most teenagers may find it perfectly acceptable to travel over the speed limit especially if it is under 10 miles per hour over, but parents and law enforcement agencies need to set good examples as well as enforce the laws in place as this may be the only viable deterrent for teens.

Console & Hollawell’s accident lawyers in Bayonne have protected the rights of car accident victims since 1994. They are committed to reducing car accidents by educating the public of real dangers that exist on New Jersey roadways and throughout the country. Stay tuned for Console & Hollawell’s fifth and final installment of the teen driver series, available tomorrow, October 19, which will address the dangers that exist when teen motorists have too many passengers.

** http://www.teendriversource.org/stats/researcher/detail/63
*** http://www.nj.gov/faqs/drive/index.html
**** http://www.judiciary.state.nj.us/mcs/svbs_9-04/part1_b_c.pdf

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Richard Console