Elms College to Host Panel Discussion on Physician-Assisted Suicide

The panel will discuss Massachusetts Ballot Question 2: Prescribing Medication to End Life

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Chicopee, Massachusetts (PRWEB) October 11, 2012

Elms College, in partnership with the Diocese of Springfield, will host a special panel discussion on the Massachusetts Ballot Question 2: Prescribing Medication to End Life at 7 p.m. on October 17, 2012. The panel will attempt to address "Values at the End of Life: Ethical Issues and Physician Assisted Suicide."

The panel will consist of Massachusetts professionals giving an insightful analysis of the issue, including Mary Caritas Geary, a Sister of Providence and retired president and chief executive officer of Mercy Medical Center; Michael Duffy, a Franciscan Order Friar, nursing professor, and nurse practitioner; Shawn Charest, M.D., medical director of Mercy Hospice; attorney James Driscoll, executive director of Massachusetts Catholic Conference; and pharmacist Donald Davenport, official representative of the Committee Against Physician Assisted Suicide. The panel will discuss the healthcare delivery, nursing, hospice, and legal perspectives of physician-assisted suicide.

The discussion is part of the Mary Dooley Lecture Series and will be held in Veritas Auditorium in Berchmans Hall on the Elms College campus. Now in its twenty-sixth year, the Mary Dooley Lecture Series is presented annually by the religious studies department at the Institute for Theology and Pastoral Studies at Elms College.

Elms College is a co-educational, Catholic college offering a liberal arts curriculum that gives students multiple perspectives on life. Founded in 1928 by the Sisters of St. Joseph, Elms College has a tradition of educating reflective, principled, and creative learners, who are rooted in faith, educated in mind, compassionate in heart, responsive to civic and social obligations, and capable of adjusting to change without compromising principle.


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