The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace to be Sent to Donors Providing Loans of $25 or More for Entrepreneurs in Developing Countries

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World Vision Micro will send a free copy of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace to donors who give $25 or more for small loans that help entrepreneurs in developing countries. Recipients of a World Vision Micro loan are typically women who do not have collateral or a credit history to secure a traditional loan. Authored by Gary Chapman and Paul White, The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace was recently named one of the top 50 new management books for entrepreneurs.

The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace

The book is free to those who give $25 or more for small business loans in developing countries.

I wish every workplace had this. People would want to go to work. People would be more productive and excited about different tasks. They would feel motivated.”

Donors giving $25 or more to World Vision Micro will receive a free copy of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace, a book that helps workers communicate appreciation to their colleagues in meaningful ways.

Authored by Dr. Gary Chapman and Dr. Paul White, the book was recently named one of the top 50 new management books for entrepreneurs.

“A donation to World Vision Micro helps start or expand a business for a hard-working person in a developing country,” says White, a psychologist, author, speaker, and business consultant. “Our book helps you take practical steps to make any workplace environment more encouraging and productive.”

Both the microloan and White's book empower entrepreneurs, but in different ways.

Recipients of World Vision Micro are typically women who do not have collateral or a credit history to secure a traditional loan. For example, Jacqueline became the sole provider for her family in Rwanda after her husband, a soldier, was killed. Life got even worse for the widowed mother of five when she lost her teaching job.

"That's when we heard about (World Vision Micro) giving small loans," she says.

With a loan and business training, Jacqueline opened a restaurant along with two other widows. It quickly became the most popular eatery in town.

"Because of the loan, my children have food to eat," Jacqueline says. "They have clothes. They go to school. Our community is really happy."

The workplace community at the Canadian Red Cross in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, has also seen its happiness grow. It increased employees’ understanding of each other with The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace.

April McBride, a Canadian Red Cross community services coordinator, introduced the book and its lessons as part of an office wellness program.

When McBride first explained what she was doing, there were a few grumbling comments, including, “I hope this doesn’t take long.” But that soon changed.

McBride gave everyone his or her own code, which comes with the book. She then sent them back to their computers to take the online “Motivating By Appreciation Inventory.” The 15-minute test assessed individuals' preferences for how they are best encouraged and feel appreciated at work.

The results identified each person’s primary and secondary “language” in the workplace among five possibilities:

-- Words of affirmation
-- Quality time
-- Acts of service
-- Tangible gifts
-- Physical touch

Each person received a nine-page document describing the results of their individual inventory. It included tips on how team members can encourage an employee in his or her primary language. For example, a person whose primary language is “acts of service” will feel more appreciated if he or she receives help accomplishing tasks that will assist in getting a project done more quickly.

Information from the individual inventories was put into an office profile available to everyone. McBride says those initially skeptical employees became quite animated and enthusiastic when they learned how knowledge of a colleague’s primary language could help energize and motivate them.

The book uses symbols to designate each primary language. McBride cut out, laminated, and posted the symbols on the office door of each employee.

“When you see the symbol it’s just a quick reminder,” says McBride. “If you know, for example, that `words of affirmation’ is a person’s language you might give a few kind words, even if it feels a little awkward at first. It’s not rocket science but it is effective and it’s very easy to apply.”

The MBA Inventory showed McBride’s primary language is “quality time.” This helped her understand why she feels so valued as a person and as an employee when her supervisor stops by her office to talk for a few minutes.

McBride and other employees scoring high for “quality time” now eat lunch together at least twice a week.

“We now know that’s what builds us up,” says McBride. “It’s about being intentional with each other.”

Overall, McBride sees increased harmony and satisfaction in her workplace. “The rewards and benefits of this will be long lasting,” she says.

“I wish every workplace had this. People would want to go to work. People would be more productive and excited about different tasks. They would feel motivated.”

  • * *

World Vision Micro is part of World Vision, a Christian humanitarian organization tackling the causes of poverty and injustice. Click here to help fund the loan of a worthy entrepreneur and receive The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace.

For more information about The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace and its training resources, go to http://www.appreciationatwork.com. To interview Dr. White or have him as a guest on your program, contact Karen Campbell at (616) 309-4390 or karencampbellmedia(at)gmail(dot)com

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