Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin Reports on Study That Has Exposed the Big Vitamin D Myth

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a study out of New Zealand that has debunked the theory that vitamin D, the “sunshine vitamin,” can significantly reduce the incidence or severity of colds.

big vitamin D myth

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin Reports on Study That Has Exposed the Big Vitamin D Myth

While vitamin D is enormously important on many fronts, taking a monthly dose of 100,000 IU is unlikely to protect against the common cold or flu.

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The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a study out of New Zealand that has debunked the theory that vitamin D, the “sunshine vitamin,” can significantly reduce the incidence or severity of colds.

As reported in Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/general-health-2/the-big-vitamin-d-myth-exposed), some previous information shows a possible protective effect in vitamin D against the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (colds). Now a piece of high-profile health news found that people taking 100,000 IU (international units) a month of vitamin D3 did not experience a significant reduction in the incidence or severity of their colds.

As noted in the article “The Big Vitamin D Myth Exposed,” researchers in New Zealand conducted a study to see how effective vitamin D supplements actually were in preventing or treating colds. Out of the 322 healthy adults who participated in the study, those individuals in the vitamin D group received an initial dose of 200,000 IU oral vitamin D3, 200,000 IU one month later, and then 100,000 IU each month for a year and a half. The comparison group took a placebo.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups, with an average of 3.7 infections per person taking vitamin D, and 3.8 per person taking the placebo over the 18 months. Also, in both groups, people had colds for the same time span: an average of 12 days.

As the article concludes, the takeaway message is that, while vitamin D is enormously important on many fronts, taking a monthly dose of 100,000 IU is unlikely to protect against the common cold or flu. However, it remains important to consider vitamin D on a regular basis, and ensure the body is getting enough of this nutrient.

(SOURCE: Murdoch, D et al., “Effect of Vitamin D3 Supplementation on Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Healthy Adults. The VIDARIS Randomized Controlled Trial,” JAMA 2012; 308[13]: 1,333–9.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

The Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various alternative remedies, including Traditional Chinese Medicine. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press' views on Traditional Chinese Medicine, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/chinesemedicine.

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